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Experiment 5: Series and Parallel CircuitsAmber LuPhysics 2240.509University of North Texas1 March 2017
1AbstractIn this experiment, we constructed series and parallel circuits, calculating their equivalence both exper-imentally by measuring the voltage and current of four constructed circuits and theoretically by usingOhm’s Law and equivalence resistance equations. We wanted to examine the differences in parallel cir-cuits and series circuits in their equivalence resistances.To do this, we constructed four different circuits using560Ωresistors,330Ωresistors, and100Ωre-sistors in parallel configurations, series configurations, and both parallel and series configurations. Forthe first circuit diagram (series), the theoretical equivalence resistance was872Ω, and the experimental,or measured, equivalence resistance was884Ω.For the second circuit diagram (parallel), the theoreticalequivalence resistance was202., and the equivalence resistance measured from the voltage and cur-rent was199Ω. For the third circuit diagram (series and parallel), the theoretical equivalence resistancewas299., and the experimental equivalence resistance was299Ω. For the fourth circuit diagram (se-ries and parallel), the theoretical equivalence resistance was379., and the experimental equivalenceresistance was378Ω. The percent difference between the theoretical equivalence resistance and measuredequivalence resistance was 1.37%, 1.51%, 0.167%. and 0.37%, respectively.2IntroductionThe primary purpose of the experiment was to demonstrate series, parallel, and series and parallel circuits,calculating for the equivalence resistance experimentally and theoretically. In the theoretical approach, weused the two equivalence resistance relationships and the known resistance of each resistor to calculatethe resistance of the circuit. We then compared that value to the experimentally determined equivalenceresistance measured through voltage and current. Similar values between the two equivalence resistanceswould indicate the accuracy of Ohm’s Law to calculate for resistance within the circuit.A resistor is generally used to describe a device that follows Ohm’s Law, which is as follows:V=IR(1)where V is the voltage drop across the device measured in volts, I is the current measured in amperes,and R is the resistance measured in ohms.Resistors can be connected in two different ways. The first way is in a series, in which the resistorsare directly adjacent. This method of connecting resistors can be illustrated in Figure 1. Every circuit ofresistors has an equivalence resistance, which would be the resistance if a single resistor were to replacethe circuit. In a series circuit, the equivalent resistance is directly additive of the resistances of the variousresistors.

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