Glaeser et al.-The Rise of the Skilled City.pdf

Glaeser et al.-The Rise of the Skilled City.pdf - The Rise...

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The Rise of the Skilled City [with Comments] Author(s): Edward L. Glaeser, Albert Saiz, Gary Burtless and William C. Strange Source: Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs , ookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs (2004), pp. 47-105 Published by: Brookings Institution Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25067406 Accessed: 16-08-2016 16:10 UTC Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at http://about.jstor.org/terms JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] Brookings Institution Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs This content downloaded from 137.99.100.120 on Tue, 16 Aug 2016 16:10:06 UTC All use subject to http://about.jstor.org/terms
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EDWARD L. GLAESER Harvard University and National Bureau of Economic Research ALBERT SAIZ University of Pennsylvania The Rise of the Skilled City Between 1980 and 2000, the population of metropolitan areas w less than 10 percent of adults had college degrees in 1980, grew on a age by 13 percent. Among metropolitan areas where more than 25 cent of adults had college degrees, the average population growth r was 45 percent. For more than a century, in both the United State Great Britain, cities with more educated residents have grown faster comparable cities with less human capital.1 There is no consensus, ever, on the causes or implications of this relationship. Why have people increasingly crowded around the most skilled? W does education seem to be a more and more important ingredien agglomeration economies? Three disparate, but not incompatible, vis of the modern city offer different answers to these questions. The sumer City view?cities are increasingly oriented around consumpti amenities, not productivity?tells us that skills predict growth beca skilled neighbors are an attractive consumption amenity. The Inform City view?cities exist to facilitate the flow of ideas?tells us tha should expect cities to be increasingly oriented around the sk because the skilled specialize in ideas. The Reinvention City vi cities survive only by adapting their economies to new technolo Glaeser thanks the National Science Foundation and the Taubman Center for Stat Local Government for financial support. Shannon Mail provided superb research tance. 1. Glaeser (1994); Glaeser, Scheinkman, and Shleifer (1995); Simon (1998); Black and Henderson (1999); Nardinelli and Simon (1996, 2002). 47 This content downloaded from 137.99.100.120 on Tue, 16 Aug 2016 16:10:06 UTC All use subject to http://about.jstor.org/terms
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48 Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs: 2004 tells us that human capital predicts city growth because human capital enables people to adapt well to change.2 Understanding why skills pre
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