Chapter 10-Emotional Social Develop Childhood PartII

Infants, Children, and Adolescents (6th Edition)

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Chapter 10: Chapter 10: Emotional and Social Emotional and Social Development in Early Development in Early Childhood Childhood
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Foundations of Morality Foundations of Morality Preschoolers show concern with deviations between the way things should be and the way they actually are. Conscience begins to take shape during the preschool years Externally controlled Inner standards
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Theories of Moral Development Theories of Moral Development Psychoanalytic stresses the side of conscience development Social Learning Theory focuses on more Cognitive-Developmental emphasizes
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Psychoanalytic Perspective on Psychoanalytic Perspective on Moral Development Moral Development Moral development is largely complete by 5 or 6 Superego conscience obey to avoid guilt
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The Power of Inductive Discipline The Power of Inductive Discipline Discipline that supports conscience formation effects of misbehavior on others are communicated to the child More likely to make up for their misdeeds and exhibit prosocial behavior Tells children how to behave so they can use the information in future situations
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The Role of Guilt The Role of Guilt An important motivator of moral action Guilt reactions Moral development gradual process
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Social Learning Theory and Social Learning Theory and Moral Development Moral Development Traditional behaviorists operant conditioning rewarded for good behaviors Importance of modeling Effects of punishment Alternatives to harsh punishment Positive discipline
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Importance of Modeling Importance of Modeling Preschoolers are more likely to model the prosocial actions of an adult who: Displays warmth and responsiveness Is a competent, powerful model Demonstrates between assertions and behaviors
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Effects of Punishment Effects of Punishment Long-term effects Harsh punishment: Provides children with adult models of aggression Teaches children to avoid the punishing adult Offers immediate relief to adults
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Alternatives to Harsh Punishment Alternatives to Harsh Punishment Time out Withdrawl of privileges Effectiveness of punishment is increased when: Used consistently There is a warm parent-child relationship Punishment is accompanied by an explanation
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Positive Discipline Positive Discipline Most effective forms of discipline encourage good conduct Positive and cooperative relationships with parents firmer conscience development
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Cognitive-Developmental Theory Cognitive-Developmental Theory and Moral Development and Moral Development Regards children as active thinkers about
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2008 for the course EDPSY 250 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '07 term at Ball State.

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Chapter 10-Emotional Social Develop Childhood PartII -...

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