Lecture 21-Electronic Eavesdropping

Lecture 21-Electronic Eavesdropping - Electronic...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Electronic Eavesdropping Gathering Criminal Evidence
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Electronic Eavesdropping Olmstead v. US (1928) Landmark case involving electronic communications In this case bootleggers used their personal telephones to discuss their business activities Federal agents tapped their telephone lines and and built their case upon what was overheard
Background image of page 2
Electronic Eavesdropping Upon appeal after their convictions, the offenders argued that federal agents had seized info illegally without a search warrant…they were not “secure in their homes.” The court ruled that the telephone lines were not an extension of their homes and therefore not Constitutionally protected
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Electronic Eavesdropping As early as 1952 (in On Lee v. US) the Court decided that recording devices on the body of undercover officers produced admissible evidence. In 1967 (Berger v. NY), wiretaps and bugs were permitted wherever state law permitted the use of such devices and an appropriate warrant was obtained based upon probable cause.
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

Lecture 21-Electronic Eavesdropping - Electronic...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online