Chapter 6- Clouds

Chapter 6- Clouds - The Basic Cloud Types High clouds -...

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High clouds - cirrus, cirrostratus, and cirrocumulus Middle clouds - altostratus and altocumulus Low clouds - stratus, stratocumulus, and nimbostratus Clouds with vertical development - cumulus and cumulonimbus The Basic Cloud Types
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High clouds are generally above 6000 m (19,000 ft). The simplest of the high clouds are cirrus , which are wispy aggregations of ice crystals.
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Cirrostratus clouds are composed entirely of ice but tend to be more extensive horizontally and have a lower concentration of crystals. When viewed through a layer of cirrostratus, the Moon or Sun has a whitish, milky appearance but a clear outline. A characteristic feature of cirrostratus clouds is the halo , a circular arc around the Sun or Moon formed by the refraction (bending) of light as it passes through the ice crystals.
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Cirrocumulus are composed of ice crystals that arrange themselves into long rows of individual, puffy clouds. Cirrocumulus form during episodes of
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2008 for the course CJC 101 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '07 term at Ball State.

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Chapter 6- Clouds - The Basic Cloud Types High clouds -...

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