Chapter 7- Hurricanes

Chapter 7- Hurricanes - Extremely strong tropical storms go...

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Extremely strong tropical storms go by a number of different names, depending on where they occur. Over the Atlantic and the eastern Pacific they are known as hurricanes . Those over the extreme western Pacific are called typhoons ; those over the Indian Ocean and Australia are cyclones .
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Middle- and upper-level air along the eastern side of anticyclones sinks as it approaches the west coasts of adjacent continents. Because the air does not descend all the way to the surface, a subsidence inversion called the trade wind inversion forms above the surface. The air below the inversion, called the marine layer , is cool and relatively moist.
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Hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of 120 km/hr (74 mph) and are typically about 600 kilo meters (350 mi) wide. Sea level pressure near the center of a typical hurricane is around 950 mb, but pressures as low as 870 mb have been observed for extremely powerful hurricanes.
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Hurricanes obtain most of their energy from the latent heat released by condensation and are most
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2008 for the course CJC 101 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '07 term at Ball State.

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Chapter 7- Hurricanes - Extremely strong tropical storms go...

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