Lecture 9 part I

Lecture 9 part I - 1 LECTURE 9 INTERNAL FORCES IN...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 LECTURE 9 INTERNAL FORCES IN STRUCTURAL MEMBERS PART I INTRODUCTION INTERNAL FORCES IN STRUCTURAL MEMBERS SHEAR FORCES AND BENDING MOMENT IN BEAMS 2 I NTRODUCTION Previously, we dealt with the reactions from the support using the equations of equilibrium for a structure. We introduced the concepts of truss and frame, which share the common structural characteristic, i.e., they are all pin-connected. Here the frame refers to the non-rigid frame, which has rigid connection instead of pin-connection. However, in engineering structures, there are many connections without pins. In this lecture, we are introducing some basic forms of structures without pin connections. When a structural member is subjected to a system of external loads (applied loads and support reactions), a system of internal resisting forces develop within the member to balance the external loads. Considering the applied forces F i in a body in equilibrium shown in Fig. 8-1 a , the forces have the tendency to tear the body apart. Internal forces will develop within the body to resist the change on the body due to the applied loads. These internal forces are exposed by cutting the body with a plane aa . Fig. 8-1 Body subject to external force and the corresponding free-body-diagram The FBD on the left part of the body is shown in Fig. 8-2a. The internal force distributed on plane aa can be replaced by the resultant force R and the moment M , as shown in Fig. 8-2 a . The resultant force R and couple M can be further resolved into a component ( normal force ) a ) b ) 3 perpendicular to the plane aa , R n , and the other force ( shear force ) tangent to plane aa , R t , as shown in Fig. 8-2 b ....
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2009 for the course CVEN 221 taught by Professor - during the Summer '08 term at Texas A&M.

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Lecture 9 part I - 1 LECTURE 9 INTERNAL FORCES IN...

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