Lecture 7 part I

Lecture 7 part I - LECTURE 7 EQUILIBRIUM OF RIGID BODIES...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 LECTURE 7 EQUILIBRIUM OF RIGID BODIES PART I Contents INTRODUCTION FREE-BODY DIAGRAMS EQUILIBRIUM IN TWO DIMENSIONS
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 I NTRODUCTION It has been shown that for the case of rigid body, the most general system can be expressed in terms of a resultant force R and a resultant couple C . Therefore, for a rigid body to be in equilibrium, both R and C must vanish, i.e. 0 xyz FFF =++ = ∑∑∑ Rij k 0 MMM = Cij k (1) In scalar form, it reads 000 === (2) The forces and moments that act on a rigid body are either external or internal. Forces applied to a rigid body by another body or by the earth are external forces. External forces can be divided into applied forces exerted by external bodies and reaction forces exerted by supports or connections. The internal forces will be dealt with later. Free–body Diagrams The basic steps to draw a free-body diagram (FBD) include Decide the body to be isolated from the remaining A sketch of the free body Identify and label all forces and moments exerted on the free body
Background image of page 2
3 Choose the appropriate axes to be used in solving the problem When connections or supports are removed from the isolated body, the action of the connection or supports must be represented by forces and/or moments on the FBD. Figures 6-1 and 6-2 show some idealizations of two - and three -dimensional supports.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

Lecture 7 part I - LECTURE 7 EQUILIBRIUM OF RIGID BODIES...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online