120ALecture6Handout

120ALecture6Handout - Why study attention? Inattentional...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Why study attention? History of study of attention Attention in Audition Theories of Attention http://www.cs.ubc.ca/%7Erensink/flicker/download/index.html If you do not attend to something, you may not consciously “perceive” it at all. http://viscog.beckman.uiuc.edu/grafs/demos/15.html http://quirkology.com/USA/Video_ColourChangingTrick.shtml Inattentional Blindness Change Blindness Big Questions • If you do not attend to something, how much information will you process? • What causes you to attend to one thing and ignore another?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What is attention? • How is the word used? • Examples – Something fluttering caught my attention. – I didn’t see you, I was paying attention to the game. – I struggled to pay attention to the lecture. – I don’t remember even cleaning the table. I must not have been paying attention. Talking about attention • The way we talk about attention affects how we think about it – We use the same word for all of these examples • Are they really the same? – Attention as selection • Hearing one conversation but not another – Attention as a resource • We talk about “paying” attention Attention Attention: Attention is the set of cognitive and neurophysiological mechanisms that implement the selection of relevant perceptual input and the rejection of what’s irrelevant
Background image of page 2
What is attention? Traditionally research has distinguished between two forms of attention. Selective attention: Participants are told to attend to one stimulus and ignore another. This informs us about the process of selection, and what happens to unattended stimuli. Divided attention: Participants attend to all stimuli. This informs us about processing limitations and attentional capacity Selective Attention Constant bombarded by stimuli - Limited capacity Selective attention refers to the selective processing of task relevant information and the successfully ignoring irrelevant info. Facilitatory and Inhibitory mechanisms Shadowing task What is Remembered In Unattended Ear During Shadowing Task After Long Delay?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Shadowing task What gets through the unattended ear? • Low level information gets through. Subjects are aware of: – nonspeech sounds (clicks, buzzers) – gender of speaker (shifts in voice) – Was it a human voice? • Subjects are NOT aware of – content (same word repeated 30 times) – syntax (sentences vs. random words) – language (shifts in language of speaker, e.g. English vs. German) Early Selection / Filter Model • Only one sensory channel is allowed to proceed • Stimuli filtered at early sensory level A situation --“cocktail party effect” • You are sitting in class listening to a lecture • Two people behind you are talking
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/21/2009 for the course PSYCH 120A taught by Professor Harley during the Spring '07 term at UCLA.

Page1 / 17

120ALecture6Handout - Why study attention? Inattentional...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online