110Lecture3Handout

110Lecture3Handout - Lecture 3: The nature of events...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 3: The nature of events Reprise DeFning learning Behavioral vs cognitive deFnition General process assumption Adaptive signiFcance of learning Events and their relation Pavlovian conditioning Background Basic observations Some critical control conditions habituation sensitization If a general learning process evolved that is sensitive to causal relations, how might we best study the nature of this learning process? There are two general kinds of causes: generative and preventative e.g. E1 --> E2 E1 --> no E2 How animals learn about these kinds of relations is often studied using the Pavlovian conditioning paradigm Ivan Pavlov Pavlov was a physiologist and, on his view, he remained one throughout his career despite the fact that he has had more impact on psychology than perhaps any other scientist. He studied at the University of St Petersburg in Russia and, from 1870, was primarily interested in the physiology of digestion. He developed, over several years, quite ingenious surgical techniques for measuring the salivary and gastric secretions in dogs. Saliva is secreted normally by special glands within the cheek and is then carried by ducts to the cheek s inner surface. By surgically redirecting one of these ducts, Pavlov was able to divert the saliva to the surface of the cheek where it could be collected through a connecting tube - a preparation that we now refer to as a fstula . Pavlov made three important observations:...
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110Lecture3Handout - Lecture 3: The nature of events...

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