Capítulo A Preliminar Gramática 3 - Spanish alphabet

Capítulo A Preliminar Gramática 3 - Spanish alphabet

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(El alfabeto español)
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Like the a in “fa ther,” but shorter a diós Examples: ba do na da ma ña na ca sa enca ntada *Note: In this presentation, all vowels will be circled.
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The Spanish “b” is similar to the English “b” when initial (pronounced at the beginning of a phrase) or after the letters m or n. b uenos nub lado It is softer, allowing some air to pass through the lips, when intervocalic (located between vowels). No b ailo b ien. Cub a b ien b anco Note: Also see “v.”
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The Spanish “c” has two distinct sounds, depending on its environment, that is, how it is located with respect to certain vowels. The next slide provides more details.
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. . . before the following three vowels . . . before the following two vowels Unlike the English “k” sound, the hard Spanish c is not aspirated, that is, no air is expelled when it is pronounced.
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In Spain, the “c” before e or i is pronounced “th”
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Until 1994, “ch” was considered a separate letter in Spanish, and words that began with this letter were found in a separate ch section in the dictionary after the section containing words beginning with c. It is pronounced like the English ch. Ch ile ch eque much ach o ch ica
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with the tongue farther forward against the upper teeth. When initial or after the letters n or l, it is harder; when intervocalic, it is a bit softer, much like the voiced “th” sound in the English word “they.” d ía and ar ¡Buena id ea! nad
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Capítulo A Preliminar Gramática 3 - Spanish alphabet

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