Centripetal Force and Centripetal Force Pendulum

Centripetal Force and Centripetal Force Pendulum -...

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Centripetal Force and Centripetal Force Pendulum October 7, 2008 Sloane Schneider Lab Partners: Taylor Whipple, Cory Wilkinson, Amy Kalal Purpose :
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The goal of the first laboratory is to measure centripetal force delivered by a spring attached to an object moving in a circle at constant speed and then comparing it to the force required to stretch the spring directly. The goal of the second laboratory is to measure the centripetal force on a pendulum bob and compare it to a calculated force. List of Sub-Experiments : Sub-Experiment 1: Centripetal Force Sub-Experiment 2: Centripetal Force Pendulum Theory : Centripetal force is the net force causing the centripetal acceleration of an object in circular motion. Centripetal acceleration can be defined as the rate of change of tangential velocity. When considering an object moving in a circle of radius r with constant angular velocity. The tangential velocity is constant and denoted as v , but the direction of the tangential velocity vector changes as the object rotates. Centripetal acceleration is given as: = ac v2r Eq 1 Expressed linearly the equation can be given as = v ωr Eq 2 where ω is the angular velocity. By substituting the second equation into the first the following equation is given: = ac ω2r Eq 3 A few notes about centripetal acceleration. The direction of centripetal acceleration is always inwards along the radius vector of circular motion and magnitude is related to the tangential speed and angular velocity as seen equations 1 and 3. Converting the angular velocity to revolutions per second gives a new equation using = 1 revs 2πrads gives: = ω 2πn Eq 4 where n is the angular velocity in revolutions per second. Centripetal acceleration can then be solved for using the following equation:
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This note was uploaded on 11/25/2008 for the course PHYS 2210 taught by Professor Sowell during the Spring '08 term at UNO.

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Centripetal Force and Centripetal Force Pendulum -...

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