PSYCH 640 Week 2 Visual Information Processing -Michaila

PSYCH 640 Week 2 Visual Information Processing -Michaila -...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

Running Head: VISUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING 1 Visual Information Processing Michaila Denton University of Phoenix PSYCH 640/ Cognitive Psychology Professor Kathleen Hughes
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

VISUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING 2 Visual Information Processing Introduction The field of cognitive psychology focuses on the mental processes that allow us to learn new information as well as use that information to reason and interact with the world around us successfully (Anderson, 2010). However, we are able to go a step further towards understanding the way that we learn and process information by examining the way that we process information through multiple venues. Having the ability to visually process information is an important part of functioning in our daily lives, which includes everything from recognizing family members and co-workers to reading traffic signs and cooking a meal (Chase, 2014). Therefore, it is particularly distressing when an individual loses their ability to use their visual information processing. Though there are numerous ways in which one’s ability to visually process and interpret information can be effected, two specific examples of impairment are visual agnosia and prosopagnosia (Anderson, 2010). It is hoped that by studying visual processing as a whole, we will gain a greater understanding of how to help those who are suffering from impairments to cope with their condition or to improve their abilities altogether. Visual Information Processing Visual information processing begins with the proper functioning of the eye. In a properly functioning eye, light passes through the lens until it reaches the retina, which is located at the back of the eye (Anderson, 2010). At this stage, the light is then converted by two types of receptor, rods and cones, into neural energy (Anderson, 2010). While cones are responsible for converting the light into a high resolution, color image, the rods are responsible for something
Image of page 2
VISUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING 3 more akin to night vision, with lower resolution and quality (Anderson, 2010). This converted neural information then travels down the optic nerve to the brain, where it then divides into subcortical structures, including the lateral geniculate nucleus and the superior colliculus (Anderson, 2010). It is at this juncture that the neural energy begins to be processed in regards to its content (Anderson, 2010). While the lateral geniculate nucleus focuses on specific details, allow the individual to perceive ‘what’ the object is that they are looking at, the superior colliculus helps the individual to process where that object is located in space (Anderson, 2010). Information is
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern