psych635-week2individual-michaila

psych635-week2individual-michaila - Forensic Psychology...

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Forensic Psychology Outline 1 Forensic Psychology Outline University of Phoenix Michaila Shaak-Denton PSYCH/635 Psychology of Learning Professor Rebecca Singer
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Forensic Psychology Outline 2 Forensic Psychology Outline I. Introduction Forensic psychology comes into play in many capacities within the criminal justice field. More specifically, if focuses on understanding the offenders and their motivations and attempts to use that information to shape effective rehabilitative programs for those offenders (Ellison & Buckhout, 1981). In many courts and court systems, mental health or substance abuse treatment can be mandated by the court to address factors that the judge has determined to contribute to their behavior with the hope that they might be deterred from future criminal actions as a result of addressing those root factors (Ellison & Buckhout, 1981). In the juvenile justice system, the focus on successful rehabilitation is even more prominent due to the young age of the offenders. Through the implementation of programs and treatments that can address negative contributing factors at a young age, juvenile offenders have a greater chance to become positive members of their communities (McGuire, 1995). However, the most successful treatments do not use only one learning theory in rehabilitation programs. For example, The Paint Creek Program uses portions of each learning theory to provide comprehensive and effective to juvenile offenders in an attempt to modify behaviors and prevent them from becoming chronic reoffenders (Vogt & Koch, 1990).
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Forensic Psychology Outline 3 A. Paint Creek Program on Learning Theory Perspectives 1. Behaviorism focuses on a behavior being acquired or learned through pairing a stimulus with a desired response, which are easily observable and measurable (Schunk, 2012).
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