Chapter 24 The Origin of Species

Chapter 24 The Origin of Species - Chapter 24: The Origin...

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Chapter 24: The Origin of Species 24.1: The biological species concept emphasizes reproduction isolation - Speciation: the process by which one species splits into two or more species The Biological Species Concept - Described by Ernst Mayr in 1942: a species is a group of populations whose members have the potential to interbreed in nature and produce viable, fertile offspring, but not with other groups - Members of a species often resemble each other because their populations are connected by gene flow Reproductive Isolation - The existence of biological factors that impede members or two species from producing viable, fertile offspring o These barriers block gene flow between species and limit the formation of hybrids - Prezygotic barriers: block fertilization from even occurring o Work by stopping members of a different species from even attempting to mate, preventing an attempted mating from being successfully completed, or by hindering fertilization if mating is completed successfully
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2009 for the course BISC 120Lg taught by Professor 11:00-01:50pm during the Fall '06 term at USC.

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Chapter 24 The Origin of Species - Chapter 24: The Origin...

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