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article4Aa - Creative people tend to be drawn to areas with...

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Unit Four: Political Economy Part A: Globalization Debate Article 14: The World is Spiky Richard Florida Thomas Friedman’s flat world theory states that technological advances, from the telephone to the internet, has leveled the “global playing field,” making geographic location less important. Florida disagrees. He has researched the international economic landscape and his results were quite the opposite. There are very few regions with spikes – and the highly spiked regions are growing taller while the shorter spikes and flat areas are getting flatter. The amount of people living in cities has gone up from 3% in the 1800s to around 50% worldwide, and 75% in developed countries. Only the most productive cities are rising. Those dominate cities seem to be attracting the talented, creative inventors, strengthening that city’s “spikiness”.
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Unformatted text preview: Creative people tend to be drawn to areas with other creative people for inspiration and the ability to feed off of and add to others ideas. This cluster is causing the spikes to grow and the hills to flatten out, which is causing problems for poorer cities. A solution to reducing the growing economic inequality while still expanding the economy is difficult because progression requires that the spiky regions continue to grow, however that is the cause of the flattening of the rest of the world. The differences between these need to be closely managed. Florida says this will be among top political challenges of the coming decades. I agree that this situation needs to be given more attention. Jennifer Clift Global Issues and Society Dr. Ruth Cater February 5, 2008...
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