cartesianism

cartesianism - Mehmet Dervisogullari Beaupre, J. Phil 100w...

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Unformatted text preview: Mehmet Dervisogullari Beaupre, J. Phil 100w February 8, 2008 What are Imaginary Appetites ? The need for money is therefore the true need produced by the economic system, and it is the only need which the latter produces. The quantity of money becomes to an ever greater degree its sole effective quality. Just as it reduces everything to its abstract form, so it reduces itself in the course of its own movement to quantitative being. Excess and intemperance come to be its true norm. Subjectively, this appears partly in the fact that the extension of products and needs becomes a contriving and ever-calculating subservience to inhuman, sophisticated, unnatural and imaginary appetites. Private property does not know how to change crude need into human need. Its idealism is fantasy, caprice and whim ; and no eunuch flatters his despot more basely or uses more despicable means to stimulate his dulled capacity for pleasure in order to sneak a favour for himself than does the industrial eunuch the producer in order to sneak for himself a few pieces of silver, in order to charm...
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This essay was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHI 100 taught by Professor Hanson during the Spring '07 term at Vanderbilt.

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