Dr. Who Syllabus S17.pdf - First-Year Writing Program |...

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First-Year Writing Program | Department of English 76-101 Sec. R: Doctor Who?: Social Justice and Public Health R. Mitchell 1 Doctor Who?: Social Justice and Public Health Course Syllabus & Policies Instructor: Ryan Mitchell Section Details: 76-101 S, TR 1:30-2:50 p.m., DH 2122 Office: Wean Hall | First Floor | Corridor 1315 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: By Appointment Only Course Description As we anticipate Trump’s White House, a matter of paramount concern is the state of public health care in the United States. During his campaign, Trump pledged to repeal the Affordable Care Act (commonly referred to as Obamacare), claiming that it results from unilateral party politics as well as places an undue burden on an individual’s self-determination. Trump’s comments are but the latest in a century-long debate concerning the legitimacy of government intervention within the domain of public health. Beginning in 1905, when the United States Supreme Court ruled in Jacobson v Massachusetts that states had the authority to enforce mandatory vaccinations when “necessary for public health or safety,” we have witnessed increases in public health legislation and policy, which have spurred controversies surrounding the ramifications of government-regulated health initiatives. For some, public health policies are a matter of social justice, representing a way to prevent millions of unnecessary deaths and build stronger, healthier communities. For others, these policies point to gross intrusions on individual liberties and freedoms. Others still claim that in their attempts to be universal, public health policies often neglect the unique sociocultural conditions that affect a community’s health practices. This section of 76-101 examines the controversies surrounding public health by tracing possible moral, ethical, and sociopolitical implications of public health policies. Through critically examining popular and academic texts regarding government-lead health initiatives, students will learn and practice the analytical skills necessary to understand and responsibly contribute to this complex social issue, which affects every one of us. By the time students complete this course, they will be able to analyze the rhetorical structure of multifaceted arguments; synthesize the major perspectives regarding the course topic; and, finally, contribute to the on-going academic conversation by researching and/or analyzing a public health policy of their choosing. Along with acquiring a robust understanding of the course content, students will end the semester with an inventory of strategies for constructing persuasive, authoritative, and reader-friendly prose.
First-Year Writing Program | Department of English 76-101 Sec. R: Doctor Who?: Social Justice and Public Health R. Mitchell 2 Required Readings (all available through Blackboard): Basham, Patrick. “From the Nanny State to the Bully State.” Review - Institute of Public Affairs 62.1 (2010): 24–25. Print.

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