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Riki Burroughs Reading Assignment #2 Dr. Dotter CJ 505 Ch. 3 The Positivist School 2. Discuss the significance of Frances Alice Kellor’s research on women criminals. Because Frances assisted her mother by delivering laundry, she had contact with the rich. Mary and Frances Eddy provided financial support, access to books and libraries, and encouragement that created in Kellor a love of intellectual pursuits. With the help of these sisters and another wealthy Coldwater woman, Celia Wooley, Kellor pursued and achieved a university education. Kellor was also influenced by Henry P. Collin, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Coldwater. Through his influence and because of her experiences with poverty as a child, Kellor became concerned with social problems, which she investigated as a reporter. Her sensitivity to and interest in the problems of the poor were manifested throughout her life, especially in her research on women prisoners and her activism on behalf of the downtrodden. Kellor began her studies of crime with Charles Henderson in the department of sociology at eh University of Chicago in 1898. During her years of graduate study, Kellor tried to contribute to the theoretical foundations and methodology of sociology in research on crime. Her enthusiasm for criminology made Henderson the natural choice to guide her studies. Her own research on women offenders expanded her investigation to include anthropometrical, psychological, and sociological dimensions. The micro-level analysis was to study the individual physical and psychological characterizes, she used measurements and observations. To examine the sociological dimensions, she used a more macro-level analysis by
looking at the collective method of questions, records, home visitations, inquiries of associates and officials, and observations of criminals in groups. Kellor began collecting data in 1899 from five correctional institutions in Illinois, Ohio, and New York. In 1901, she extended her research

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