mitotic recombination

mitotic recombination - Christy Brown Pfaffle 10/3/08...

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Christy Brown Pfaffle 10/3/08 Mitotic Recombination Usually crossing over is thought of as occurring only in meiosis in order to create more variation in the gametes. While crossing over does occur in meiosis, it will occasionally occur in mitosis. Despite the fact that this does not occur very often, it has been observed in developmental studies on animals such as Drosophila causing small patches of the tissue to look different than the rest. (Moores, 2008) When observing Drosophila in the 1930s, Calvin Bridges noticed that some females had a patch of wild type bristles while the rest of the body had what he called M phenotype. The genotype of the female flies were M + /M with M being the dominant allele that produces slender bristles. From this observation Bridges could tell that some form of segregation was occurring during mitosis in the development of these flies. He said that this was because of mitotic nondisjunction. During early development in these female flies, two sister chromatids were not split correctly therefore one cell was left with only the recessive allele while the other cell had two dominant alleles. As a result of this, one patch of tissue displayed the recessive trait while the rest of the body showed the dominant trait. (Murphy) While this is a very good explanation and it does happen,
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2008 for the course BIOL 303 taught by Professor Pfaffle during the Fall '08 term at Carthage.

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mitotic recombination - Christy Brown Pfaffle 10/3/08...

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