Feminism_-_An_Introduction

Feminism_-_An_Introduction - Feminism A Brief Introduction...

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Feminism Feminism A Brief Introduction A Brief Introduction
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What is Feminism? Cheris Kramarae and Paula Treichler feminism is a movement to end sexist  oppression   bell hooks
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A Historical Timeline First Wave   1850 – 1920 Second Wave 1960s-1980s Third Wave 1990s onward
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The First Wave 1850-1920 Priorities: Abolishing officially mandated inequalities by: Obtaining the vote for women Equal contract and property rights Opposition to chattel marriage (in which woman had no legal personhood) Healthcare for women and ‘women’s issues’
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First Wave Feminists: Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 – 1797) A Vindication of the Rights of Women Women should be educated, so that they can be companions to their husbands Women should be considered morally equal to men Since women are not educated, men need to improve their situation in life I do not wish them to have power over men, but over  themselves.  
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815- 1902): Like many American First Wave feminists, Stanton started out as an abolitionist Other concerns first wave feminists had can be seen through Stanton’s interests, which included: parental and custody rights property rights employment and income rights birth control So long as women are slaves, men will be  knaves.  
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Birth Control and Margaret Sanger(1879-1966) In 1914, Sanger published and mailed a magazine, Women Rebel , advocating the use of birth control techniques she had learned about in France. In 1916, she opened the first birth control clinic in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn. Hundreds of women attended the clinic; but within one month police arrested Sanger, her sister, and her friend and closed the clinic. Griswold v. Connecticut - The Supreme
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Feminism_-_An_Introduction - Feminism A Brief Introduction...

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