philosophy - Philosophy, Morality and Society Sam Mooney...

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Philosophy, Morality and Society Sam Mooney 41450345 Albert Camus’s Philosophy of the Absurd "Who, in actuality, is the absurd guy? One who, without opposing it, does nothing for the end of life? Not that homesickness is distant to him. But he favors his courage and his way of thinking. The first educates him to live devoid of petition and to get the length of with what he has; the second lets somebody know him of his restrictions. Assured of his temporally limited freedom, of his revolt devoid of future and of his mortal consciousness, he lives out his adventure within the span of his lifetime"(Braun, 1973). In Albert Camus's famous novels there are many out of the ordinary occurrences, the theory of absurdity is thought of quite frequently throughout. The main character gets him into a predicament that develops Camus's philosophy of the absurd. His philosophy is that humans tend to impose a rational order on the world in the face of evidence that the world is absurd. The word (Braun, 1973) "absurd” means clearly unreasonable. This means that Camus is saying that all people think there is a certain type of order in a place that clearly has no order. It is not absurd to follow what, you feel, is right and it is not absurd to follow what, you know, is socially acceptable. It may not be very individual to constantly follow what is socially acceptable but it is certainly not absurd. If anything is absurd it is the fact that Camus thinks that having an order to daily life is clearly unreasonable. The writings are an examination of Camus's philosophy of the absurd, it's not that he is going to question one’s morals, it contains no lessons to test one’s moral self. Camus's philosophy of the absurd characterizes the world and human existence as having no rational 1
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Philosophy, Morality and Society Sam Mooney 41450345 purpose or meaning (Sagi, 2002). Despite the absence of a rational purpose or meaning, human beings demand that there be one. He suggests that human beings are pushed into a life that can only end in death. Usually the hero's personality represents this philosophy. In keeping with this philosophy, Camus’s hero is simple, direct, his lack of reaction, his sheer acceptance of abuse, his lack of caring, and the lack of interest, offers no logical interpretation that ties his life together in any meaningful way. The character’s life may be absurd but the thought of the entire human race lying under
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2008 for the course PHIL 132 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '07 term at San Diego.

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philosophy - Philosophy, Morality and Society Sam Mooney...

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