cse21.fa07.solutionpracticefinal

cse21.fa07.solutionpracticefinal - Solutions to the Sample...

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Solutions to the Sample Final 1. Find general solutions to the following two recurrences: (a) g(n+2)=3g(n+1)+g(n), 0 n , where g(0) = 1, g(1)=1. Using the Theorem 9 in the book on page 135 to solve this problem: The two solutions to 2 310 xx −− = are 31 3 2 ± . So, the general form is 11 2 2 () nn g nK rK r =+ , and we solve the values to 12 , K K using the values g(0) = 1, g(1)=1. (0) 1 g KK == + , (1) 1 3/2*( ) 13/2*( ) g == + + . 13 1 13 1 , 21 3 3 −+ . 13 1 3 13 13 1 3 13 ( ) ( ) 22 3 3 gn +− (b) h(n+2)=8h(n+1)-16h(n), 0 n , where h(0) = 1, h(1)=1. The only solutions to 2 81 60 −+= is 4. So, the general form is 2 1 hn Kr Knr , and we solve the values of , K K using the values h(0) = 1, h(1)=1. 1 (0) 1 hK , 2 (1) 1 4 4 ==+ . 1, 3 / 4 . 3 () 4 ( 4 ) 4 n =− 2. We could have k = 0, 1, 2, 3 possible defective bulbs to be chosen. For each k (k defective bulbs), the possibilities that k bulbs are chosen can calculated as follows: stage 1: choose k defective bulbs. Number of choices: 5 k ⎛⎞ ⎜⎟ ⎝⎠ stage 2: choose 3 k more bulbs from good bulbs. Number of choices: 7 3 k Total number of possible choices: 12 3 The expected number of defective bulbs are 1..3 57 3 5 12 4 3 k kk k =
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2008 for the course CSE cse 21 taught by Professor Graham during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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cse21.fa07.solutionpracticefinal - Solutions to the Sample...

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