233684355-Hypertension.docx

233684355-Hypertension.docx - Surname 1 Students Name...

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Surname 1 Student’s Name Professor’s Name: Course: Date of Submission: Case Study: Hypertension. Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a common condition of prolonged forceful flow of blood in the blood vessels. It is the measure of the force exerted against the walls of the blood vessels as blood flows through them. The degree of the force against the blood vessel walls is determined by the cardiac output and the resistance of the blood vessels to blood flow. Therefore, blood pressure is considered high when the heart pumps large volumes of blood through narrow blood vessels. Under the condition of high blood pressure, the forceful pumping of blood strains the heart and destroys blood vessels (Aoki et al. 5). The risks of heart attack, stroke, kidney problems or even death are higher for anyone suffering from hypertension. In most cases, the cause of hypertension is unknown, but can be attributed to various predisposing factors, which increase the chances of developing high blood pressure. When there lacks a specific cause of high blood pressure, the condition is referred to as essential hypertension. Essential hypertension has various factors that raise its chances of developing in an individual (Colangelo et al. 287). They include age, family history, race, the amount of salt intake, the level of exercise, obesity, tobacco, and alcohol intake. The risk of developing hypertension increases with age. The condition is prevalent in individuals of over 60 years of age. People of African origin are more susceptible to high blood pressure than any other race. Body overweight and lack of exercise increase the risk of developing high blood pressure.
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Surname 2 Hypertension prevalence is higher on certain lifestyles, especially those involving high levels of dietary salt intake, low potassium intake, and excessive tobacco and alcohol consumption. There are other known conditions or causes which usually result in high blood pressure, a condition known as secondary hypertension. Kidney diseases are known to be a key cause of hypertension. Other causes include disorders of the adrenal and thyroid glands, diabetes, and certain medical drugs, such as birth control pills and ibuprofen (Colangelo et al. 290). The symptoms of hypertension are barely noticeable for most patients and can harm silently. Some of the high blood pressure symptoms include prolonged headache, nausea, dizziness, blurred vision, nose bleeding, irregular heartbeats, and shortness of breath. Prolonged hypertension enlarges or weakens the heart and may result in heart failure. Narrowing of blood vessels can result in kidney failure, heart attack, and stroke in the kidneys, heart and brain respectively. High blood pressure can rupture eye blood vessels resulting in blurred vision or blindness (Pagani et al.134).
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