Raisin in the Sun.docx - Raisin in the Sun A Pivotal Drama...

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Raisin in the Sun: A Pivotal Drama in the Civil Rights Movement Hansberry’s Untimely Timeliness o The first play by an African American woman to open on Broadway and the first play of either an African American or a woman to receive the New York Theatre Critics’ Award, A Raisin in the Sun debuted on Broadway in 1959. IN 1989, the first made-for-TV movie was produced; in 2004 there was another revival of the play on Broadway, starring Sean Combs (Diddy), Phyllicia Rashad, and Audra McDonald. The play aired on ABC as a made-for-TV movie in 2008 Repetition, Running in Place, Moving On o Characters’ dreams and psychic movements are coupled with material migrations and movements: Mama and Big Walter’s movement form the South to the North, and the anticipated moves from the Southside to Clybourne Park, and of Asagai’s return to Africa are all part of a more inclusive freedom movement. But these movements are important not only because they occur again and again, but in fact that none of these movements gets accomplished in the play. Asagai’s movements points to the way migration is repeated in the play, and the way migration is part of the physical force of the play o Want to move forward and progress buy 3 generations are trapped in the same space and time o Civil rights movement in part of a universal movement for the transformation of all humanity Cultural Dream Work o The play connects the psychic action of dreaming with the demand that it be realized in material social and economic practices. The title of the lay, is taken from the Langston Hughes’s poem “Harlem.” Hughes poem begins with the question of what happens to a dream deferred, and concludes with the question as to whether a deferred dream “sags like a heavy load/Or does it explode?” This mid-century play shifts the ground of American drama and supplies a perspective on a paradigm shift in American culture o In the same way that All My Sons clearly engages with WWII and its aftermath, and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof addresses the psycho-sexual implications of the Cold War, Raisin is invested in decolonization movements both in Africa and Latin America occurring around the time the play was produced and that continued to

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