21 - CHAPTER 21 Amines and Their Derivatives The nitrogen...

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CHAPTER 21 Amines and Their Derivatives The nitrogen orbitals in amines are sp 3 hybridized. The geometry of the nitrogen atom and its three substituents is called pyramidal .
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When an amine has three different substituents (plus the lone pair of electrons), it has the potential to be optically active: At ordinary temperatures amines are not optically active because of rapid inversion . Amines form weaker hydrogen bonds than alcohols do. The boiling points of amines generally lie between those of the corresponding alkane and alcohol.
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Amines are formally derived from ammonia Amines are formally derived from ammonia. The number of R-groups on the nitrogen atom defines the designation of primary, secondary and tertiary. Amines are very weak acids Amines are very weak acids. Amines are much less acidic than alcohols: Amide ions, R 2 N - are used to deprotonate alcohols
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Deprotonation of amines requires very strong bases: Amines are more strongly basic than alcohols, but not nearly as basic as alkoxides:
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2008 for the course CHEM CHEM 140C taught by Professor Finn during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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21 - CHAPTER 21 Amines and Their Derivatives The nitrogen...

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