Music Class 17.docx - Class 17 Rhythm Tempo and Meter...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 11 pages.

Class 17 - Rhythm, Tempo, and MeterRhythm 1Listen to Chopin's Waltz in C-sharp minor, and consider the following questions:Does this music have a pulse?Is the pulse strong or weak?Does the pulse remain the same, or does it change as the piece progresses?What is the tempoof this piece?Does the tempo remain the same, or does it change as the piece progresses?What is the meter of this piece?What, if any, are the characteristic rhythmic patterns used in this piece? ***Example:Waltz in C-sharp minor by Frederic Chopin (0:00-2:56)Rhythmis the organization of sound in time. Earlier, we learned that every tone hasduration. It begins, exists for some period of time, and then ends.When sounds are placed one after another, the combined durations create what isknown as rhythm. Rhythm may be very complex, but some fundamental aspects ofrhythm may be easily described and understood.A basic component of rhythm is pulse (or beat). A great deal of the world’s music has apulse. Pulse is what enables us to march, dance, or just tap a finger to music. Trytapping to the pulse in this excerpt.***Example: Water Music: Suite No. 2 in D major: Alla Hornpipe by George FridericHandel (0:00-0:17/2:54)In some pieces, the pulse is strong and quite obvious. In others, it is weak and may require very focused listening to detect. The two examples below illustrate musical pulses of different strengths. The pulse in the Barber example is weak, whereas the pulse in the Verdi example is strong.***Example: Adagio for Strings by Samuel Barber (0:00-0:52/7:51)***Example: Aida: Triumphal March by Giussepe Verdi (3:28-3:53/7:21)The pulse in music may move at different rates, creating what we describe in music astempo. Compare the speed of the pulse in these examples:***Example of SLOW: Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D major, BWV 1068: Air by JohannSebastian Bach (0:00-0:19/6:01)
***Example of MEDIUM: Water Music: Suite no. 2 in D major, HWV 349: II: AllaHornpipe by George Frideric Handel(0:00-0:17/2:54)***Example of FAST: Waltz in C sharp minor, Op. 64, No. 2 by Frederic Chopin (0:33-0:54/2:56)DefinitionsTempo: The speed of therhythmof acomposition.Rhythm: Thesubdivisionof a space of time into a defined, repeated pattern.Beat: The regular pulse ofmusicwhich may be dictated by the rise or fall of the hand orbatonof theconductor, by ametronome, or by theaccentsinmusic.Rhythm 2Because most people's nervous and muscular systems are stimulated by sound,reaction to the beat of music is often spontaneous and automatic. If the beat is strongenough to be heard or felt, most people will have a natural tendency to clap their hands,tap their feet, or move their heads with the music. Even babies respond naturally to beatand meter and will move on or to the beat. Reacting to the beat is more a matter offeeling it in the body than analyzing it, hearing it, or reading it from a music score.There is a basic relationship between rhythm and the human body, essential to theunderstanding of rhythm. Our heartbeats, breathing, and walking may be used as

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture