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Pain in Companion Animals NT CS.pptx

Pain in Companion Animals NT CS.pptx - Pain and Pain...

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Pain and Pain Management in Companion Animals
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Pain in veterinary medicine Problem : our pets can’t talk and tell us they hurt, but animals suffer from pain just like we do What are some causes of pain?? Acute pain is obvious, distressing Ex: animal is limping after getting hit by a car Chronic pain can be subtle, masked as “getting old” or “slowing down” Ex: dog is twelve and has trouble getting up Remember…Age is not a disease, but pain is Treatment options: Pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals physical rehabilitation Acupuncture Laser therapy Therapeutic massage
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Pain Management Pain management is central to veterinary practice, not adjunctive. Alleviating pain is not only a professional obligation (veterinarians oath - ‘‘the relief of animal pain and suffering’’) 2007 AAHA/AAFP Pain Management Guidelines for Dogs and Cats 2015- guidelines updated
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Pain Definition: a negative response to a stimuli causing physiologic or psychologic response ; Can be internal or external Can be protective: Alerts animal to tissue damage, may lead to protective behaviors Challenges in veterinary medicine 1. No “gold standard” to assess pain 2. Most veterinary pain scales involve recognizing behavioral changes which can vary with each interpreter Over or under- estimated 3. Physiologic parameters(TPR)
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Pain in Veterinary Medicine Pain is clinically relevant(not new) Understanding of the complexity of pain (relatively new) Emphasis on ethical and medical obligations to treat pain in animals(relatively new) Assessment, prevention, and treatment of pain must become an integral part of every PE and treatment plan! Animals and people have similar neural pathways Development Conduction Modulation of pain Expression of acute and chronic pain comparable Like us, dogs and cats develop myopathies and neuropathies = pain, discomfort!!
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Assessing feline pain www.ivapm.org
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Assessing canine pain www.ivapm.org
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Clinical signs of pain Pet owners may not appreciate their pet’s behavior as an indicator of chronic pain(“he’s just getting old”) Changes in posture Temperament changes Negative reactions to palpation, petting Vocalization (rare…most animals will not cry out) Reluctance to move- musculoskeletal Appetite(increases or decreases??)
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