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mdu discussion 3.docx - Why Are Applicants with Depression...

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Why Are Applicants with Depression Less Likely To Disclose Their Illness to Employers? Within a course of a little more than a hundred years, the notion of mental illness has drastically changed. Symptoms that once constituted a person to be considered “crazy” or “possessed” are now considered illnesses and are treatable. One of the major mental illnesses prevalent within society is depression. People suffering from depression are more likely not to discuss their condition with potential employers as opposed to people suffering from conditions like heart disease or diabetes, because of the negative social stigma associated with depression and mental illness as a whole, and fear of discrimination during the employment process. Depression and mental illness as a whole, faces a negative social stigma from society. Usually within a person’s childhood, the words “crazy” and “weird” are used to describe a person’s relation to the people around them, and are continually reinforced in their usage, which would stem into their usage in adulthood. “Often the negative stereotypes involve perceptions that
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