CHAT APPLICATION USING TCP.docx - CHAT APPLICATION USING...

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CHAT APPLICATION USING TCP NAME: SINGU SAI VARUN TEJA CHOWDARY REG.NO: 15BCE0375 SLOT: L9+L10 FACULTY: ANANDA KUMAR S TASK: CHAT APPLICATION USING TCP CRYPTOGRAPHY ALGORITHMS. DES DES (the Data Encryption Standard) is a symmetric block cipher developed by IBM. The algorithm uses a 56-bit key to encipher/decipher a 64-bit block of data. The key is always presented as a 64-bit block, every 8th bit of which is ignored. However, it is usual to set each 8th bit so that each group of 8 bits has an odd number of bits set to 1. The algorithm is best suited to implementation in hardware, probably to discourage implementations in software, which tend to be slow by comparison. However, modern computers are so fast that satisfactory software implementations are readily available. DES is the most widely used symmetric algorithm in the world, despite claims that the key length is too short. Ever since DES was first announced, controversy has raged about whether 56 bits is long enough to guarantee security. The key length argument goes like this. Assuming that the only feasible attack on DES is to try each key in turn until the right one is found, then 1,000,000 machines each capable of testing 1,000,000 keys per second would find (on average) one key every 12 hours. Most reasonable people might find this rather comforting and a good measure of the strength of the algorithm. Those who consider the exhaustive key-search attack to be a real possibility (and to be fair the technology to do such a search is becoming a reality) can overcome the problem by using double or triple length keys. In fact, double length keys have been recommended for the financial industry for many years. Use of multiple length keys leads us to the Triple-DES algorithm, in which DES is applied three times. If we consider a triple length key to consist of three 56-bit keys K1, K2, K3 then encryption is as follows: • Encrypt with K1 • Decrypt with K2 • Encrypt with K3
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Decryption is the reverse process: • Decrypt with K3 • Encrypt with K2 • Decrypt with K1 Setting K3 equal to K1 in these processes gives us a double length key K1, K2.
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