Psych 1 paper.docx - Prabhleen Sidhu Psychology 1...

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Prabhleen Sidhu November 11, 2015 Psychology 1 Meditation Helps In this paper, I am reacting to “Meditation Helps Sleep Disturbance, Cuts Fatigue, Depression”, an article that I found on www. Medscape.com, by Pauline Anderson . And, The Effects of a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Programme on Pre-sleep Cognitive Arousal and Insomnia Symptoms: A Pilot Study by Andrea L. Cincotta and other researchers. The authors’ purpose is to inform the readers of older adults that adhere to a meditation strategy, and are made known to an enhanced sleep standard. Along with better sleep, researchers found that adults who meditate are less exhausted during the day and experience a decrease in depression. These articles are focused on the idea that meditation can help reduce depression, anxiety, insomnia, work-related stress and other diseases. Pauline Anderson’s study was conducted among adults without any sleep disorders. The study included 49 adults that were 55 years and older with no cognitive impairment or depression who experienced sleep disturbances. These adults participating in the study and are divided up into two groups: a sleep hygiene education (SHE) program or the mindfulness awareness practice (MAP) intervention. When the study was conducted, patients were divided based on if they were experiencing the mindfulness awareness practice intervention or the sleep hygiene education program to experiment which group experienced better sleep. The MAP candidates practiced mindful sitting meditation, mindful eating, mindful walking, and mindful movement to improve their attention, awareness, stillness, and empathy. Mindfulness means to maintain a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment. The other study group, SHE participants, practiced sleep hygiene, which is an avoidance of noise, bright lights, and intake of caffeine or alcohol before sleep. The results showed only an increase of mindfulness in MAP contestants but no change was seen in SHE participants. MAP was more effective for a better night’s sleep, no signs of depression but uplifted good moods, and a decrease in daytime fatigue was shown in the MAP group.
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