Hist 130 Syllabus.docx - Hist 130(DIVR History of...

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Hist 130 (DIVR) History of Organized Crime in America (3 credits) Dr. Kenneth Faunce Office: Wilson- Short 322 Fall 2017 Office Hours: 8:00- 9:00, 2:00-3:00 MWF MWF 1:10-2:00 and by appointment Cleveland 30E Phone: 335-7554 E-mail: [email protected] COURSE DESCRIPTION: Organized crime has a long and notorious history within North America. Today's criminal organization can be traced back centuries to pirates who operated off the Atlantic coast. Organized crime reflects the diversity of the American population and the diversity in American Society. During the nineteenth century, criminal organizations were formed around bootlegging, smuggling, bank robberies, and cattle rustling. These organization represented the diversity in ethnicity and during the century. During the era of prohibition, the profits reaped catapulted organized crime to a new level of sophistication, wealth, and power, and became more global in nature. The increased use of illicit drugs and other illegal (and consensual) products and services have fueled the proliferation of criminal organizations and illegal markets in the last three decades. Today, organized crime is carried out by a diverse number of groups which have become increasingly transnational and have assumed a critical role in the most profitable criminal activities. This course will examine the role and impact of the rise of organized crime in the United States. The beginnings of organized crime will be discussed as well as its spread through America culture, including its diversification, and links to American success and the American Dream. Also, the myths and perceptions of organized crime that are common within American society will be examined. Students will engage with and analyze the realities and stereotypes in the treatment of organized crime. Students will analyze how both culture/society and cultural differences are influenced by factors such as history, politics, power and privilege, communication styles, economics, institutionalized discrimination and inequality, as well as cultural values, beliefs, and practices through the lens of organized crime. Learning Goals & Objectives. 1. Foster Diversity : Students will understand, respect and interact constructively with others of similar and diverse cultures, values, and perspectives, especially via primary and secondary sources that expose students to a wide variety of world views over time and across space. 2. Develop Critical and Creative Thinking : Students will use reason, evidence, and context to increase knowledge, to reason ethically, and to innovate in imaginative ways, especially via interpretation and synthesis of historical documents, analytical writing and speaking, and comparative thinking. 3. Develop Communication skills : Students will write (both formally and informally), speak (in small and large groups) and listen (in lecture and to each other) to achieve intended meaning and understanding among all participants.
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  • Fall '17
  • Ken Faunce
  • History

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