Summaries.docx - MeganJaros ProfessorAllrich 6September2017...

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Megan Jaros Professor Allrich  Animal Health Management  6 September 2017 Summary #1: Activated Charcoal  Activated charcoal, also known as activated carbon, is a form of carbon that is engineered to have small pores, increasing its surface area. Just one gram of this activated carbon has a  surface area of ~3,000m 2 , which can be further improved with chemical treatment. The most  common derivatives of activated carbon are charcoal, biochar, coal, and coke (fuel).  Activated charcoal has a variety of different uses including air purification, gold  purification, decaffeination, water purification, medicine, sewage treatment, gas masks,  respirators, and more. In the metal industry, activated charcoal removes impurities to improve  the quality of the metal. Activated carbon also has many applications in regards to the  environment, removing pollutants from water and air. This is useful when considering oil spills,  organic compound spills, and industrial waste buildup. In agriculture, activated carbon is used as  a pesticide and absorbs color impurities from wine. Similar to this, activated charcoal is  extensively used in the alcohol beverage industry for its ability to filter out impurities that affect  taste, color, and odor without decreasing the alcohol content. Research is also being done on  active charcoal’s ability to store and purify gas, filter chemicals, and trap mercury. In medicine, activated carbon is used to treat poisonings and overdoses that are caused by oral ingestion. This application is most relevant to animal health management because pets often  accidentally consume substances that are toxic to them and a dose of powdered active charcoal  can reverse the poisoning and save your pet’s life. However, activated charcoal’s scope is  limited; it is ineffective for poisonings involving strong acids, cyanide, iron, lithium, arsenic,  methanol, and ethanol. Also, it is possible to aspirate a patient if the activated charcoal is  accidentally administered into the lungs.  Activated carbon is produced from carbon-rich sources like bamboo, wood, coal, lignite,  and coconut husk. The first method of activating carbon is called physical activation. The carbon is heated with other gases first and then air is introduced into this environment to burn out the  gases, leaving a dusting of activated carbon. The second method of activating carbon is called  chemical activation. The carbon is mixed with an acid, strong base, or a salt and then heated at  lower temperatures. This method is preferred because it requires less energy and time. 
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  • Fall '08
  • ALLRICH,R

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