ANOVA Lab.doc - Stat 3470 Statistics for Engineering and...

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Stat 3470 – Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences Analysis of Variance OBJECTIVES: To experimentally generate a sampling distribution of the sample mean. To determine how sample size impacts the sampling variability. To empirically verify the Central Limit Theorem in a real-life situation. 1. Retrieve the dataset STAT2470ANOVAData.MTW from Blackboard. 2. Double click on the file to launch Minitab. MINITAB PROCEDURES: Part 1 In many IC manufacturing, a plasma etching process is widely used. An engineer is interested in investigating the relationship between the RF power setting and the etch rate. He is interested in a particular gas (C 2 F 6 ) and gap (0.80 cm), and wants to test four levels of RF power: 160W, 180W, 200W, and 220W. The experiment is replicated 5 times. 1. Click on STAT > ANOVA > One-Way… 2. In the drop-down menu, select Response data are in a separate column for each factor level 3. Click in the Responses window and select C1 (Power=160), C2 (Power=180), C3 (Power=200), and C4(Power=220). 4. Click on Options a. Make sure the “Assume equal variances” box is checked b. Specify 99 for the confidence level c. Make sure the Type of confidence interval drop down menu is set to “Two-sided”. d. Click OK 5. Click on Comparisons a. Set the Error rate for comparisons to 1 b. Click only the checkbox for Tukey under “Comparison procedures assuming equal variances c. Under Results, click on the checkbox for “Grouping Information” d. Click OK 6. Click on Results a. In the drop down menu for Display of results, make sure “Simple tables” is selected. b. Make sure all of the checkboxes listed are selected c. Click OK 7. Click OK to run the ANOVA Analysis 1. State the appropriate null and alternative hypotheses for testing whether or not the mean etching rate (in nm/min) differs between RF power levels.
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