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Lab Report Template_Springs.doc

Lab Report Template_Springs.doc - Springs Yong Seop Shim...

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Springs Yong Seop Shim Tyler Deuty 8 70155 10/5/2015 10:00AM
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Objective: (3 points) Verify the linear relationship between displacement and elastic force for different objects; measure the value of the dynamic spring constant; measure the effective mass of the spring. Experimental data (3 points): Experiment # 1 Experiment # 4 SLOPE2 1.379 ± 0.01140 T 2 / kg Y-INTERCEPT 0.008443 ± 0.005577 T 2 SLOPE1 0.03283 ± 0.0001718 m / N
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Data analysis (10 points): Experiment # 1 Experiment #4.
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Results (3 points) : Static spring constant (ks) 30.5 ± 0.4 N / m Dynamic spring constant (kd) 28.6 ± 0.5 kg / T 2 Effective mass (m0) 0.006 ± 0.004 kg Discussion and Conclusion: The objectives of this lab were to verify the linear relationship between displacement and elastic force for different objects, measure the value of the dynamic spring constant, and measure the effective mass of the spring. In this lab, Hooke’s law and oscillation were studied. Springs are elastic and can exert or have force, but with different elasticity for each spring. Hooke’s law helps define the force of a spring, and can be simplified into an equation and is defined as F(x) = -k s (x-x 0 ) or, with x 0 set to 0, F(x) = -k d x. Therefore, the equation for the spring’s constant is N/m. Theoretically, the static spring constant and the dynamic spring constant of a single spring should be equal to each other. The spring constant is the value that determines or signifies how elastic the spring is.
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