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Wave and Tidal Energy.pptx.pptx - INTRODUCTION Energy...

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Energy harnessed from waves of the ocean that comes from the endless march of waves as they roll into the shore and then back out again. What is Wave energy ? INTRODUCTION For example: Electricity generation Water desalination The pumping of water (into reservoirs) It forms by transporting of energy by wind waves, and the capture of that energy to do useful work. A machine able to exploit wave energy is generally known as a wave energy converter (WEC) Waves travel vast distances across oceans at great speed. The longer the wind blows over the sea surface, the higher, longer, faster and more powerful the sea wave is. Have a short period of time, normally only lasted for seconds.
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This is how it works! Wave capture chamber set into rock face A turbine are placed in this chamber, which is turned by the air rushing in and out Turbine : convert kinetic energy to mechanical energy Generator : convert mechanical energy to electrical energy
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Wavelength : distance from one crest to the next Peak or crest : the highest point of a wave Through : the lowest point of a wave Height : difference between through and crest Period : time taken for one wave to pass a fixed point Frequency : number of waves per second that pass a fixed point Velocity : speed with which the waves are moving past a fixed point Steepness : the ration of height to width
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Tidal Energy Tidal energy is a form of hydropower that converts the energy from the natural rise and fall of the tides into electricity.
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How does it forms? Caused by the combine effects of gravitation forces exerted by the moon, sun, and the rotation of the Earth.
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Types of tides Spring tides Spring tides are especially strong tides (not named after the season). They occur when the Earth, the Sun, and the Moon are in a line. The gravitational forces of the Moon and the Sun both contribute to the tides. Spring tides occur during the full moon and the new moon.
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Neap tide Neap tides are especially weak tides. They occur when the gravitational forces of the Moon and the Sun are perpendicular to one another (with respect to Earth) Neap tides occur during quarter moons.
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How tidal energy is harnessed? Tidal Barrages Single-basin system- ebb generation - flood generation - Two-way generation Double-basin system
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Tidal Barrages (system elements) Construction of a fairly low walled dam spanning across the entrance of a tidal inlet, basin or estuary creating a single enclosed tidal reservoir. The bottom of this barrage dam is located on the sea floor with the top of the tidal barrage being just above the highest level that the water can get too at the highest annual tide. Barrage has a number of underwater tunnels cut into its width allowing the sea water to flow through them in a controlled way by using “sluice gates” on their entrance and exit points.
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