SO245_Lesson2.docx - Lesson 2 Ethics Morals and Technology...

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Lesson 2: Ethics, Morals, and Technology Your fundamental challenge in this lesson is differentiating codes of conduct imposed on us by social institutions from moral principles adopted by individuals. Moral principles are subjective guides to how people should treat other people while relating responsibly to the natural environment that sustains all life on Earth. Codes of conduct are ideals of proper conduct adopted by corporations, governments, and every sort of organization from the Girl Scouts to the international Red Cross. Personal moral codes are based on personal experience that may be guided by religious beliefs or personal philosophies, but which ultimately are based on our intuition, our “gut feelings.” For example, Clara feels in her heart that all killing is wrong. Therefore, she opposes the death penalty. Max feels that some killing is justified, so he supports the death penalty. Max and Clara both might be opposed to certain government or corporate decisions or actions. We’ll consider this conflict between the personal and the collective as it plays out in actual behavior in the world of education, economics, urban development, or foreign policy. Learning Objectives Upon completion of Lesson 2, you should be able to: Explain Parsons’ four social requisites and compare and contrast the relational and objective modes of knowing. Differentiate codes of conduct and personal morals. Explain the technologies of persuasion. Compare and contrast instances of corporate malfeasance and principles of corporate social responsibility (CSR). What To Do Next Reading Assignments Click on the Reading Assignments link above to access your textbook reading assignments and lecture notes. Assessment After you have completed the reading assignments for this lesson and feel comfortable with the material presented, go to the Exams & Quizzes tool on the left navigation panel and complete Online Exam 2 . Congratulations! Once you have completed these items, and have received a passing score on the assessment, you are ready to move on to your next lesson! Reading Assignments Text Readings There is no textbook for this course.
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Additional Readings DIRECTIONS: To access ProQuest articles, you MUST first open a Web browser window to the ProQuest Library; otherwise, you will be denied access to the articles when you click the links. Once your browser is open to ProQuest, simply click on the link for the article you need to read. For detailed instructions on how to access ProQuest, click here . For non-ProQuest articles, use the provided Internet link to access the Required Readings material. Required Readings Internet Links Social Networking and Ethics Lecture Notes Ethics and Morals in the Context of Culture As we pointed out in Lesson 1, culture and technology are two aspects of one thing. For example, the use of snowshoes, harpoons, and dogsleds by the Inuit people (once called Eskimos), reflects the demands of an Arctic environment. In turn, day-to-day life of the Inuit shapes the norms, beliefs, and values of these Arctic dwellers. Modern industrialized societies, unlike the Inuit, live in
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