proposal-form-2017-2018-final.doc

proposal-form-2017-2018-final.doc - 1 Children with English...

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1 Children with English as an Additional Language Names Institution Affiliation
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Children with English as an Additional Language Research Title Literacy levels of Children with English as an Additional Language Proposal : Research questions 1. Do families and students with EAL face any challenge? 2. What kind of support can be given to children and their families with English as an additional language? Rationale A growing and a large number of children are learning English as an Additional Language (EAL). The trend has been experienced in the United Kingdom primary schools (Primary National Strategy, 2014). The students face challenges in attaining proficiency in spoken English while at the same time grasping the curriculum (Conteh, 2012). Such a scenario underestimates the children’s knowledge, skills, and understanding (Conteh, 2015; Clarke, 2013). It is evident that children EAL represent a high proportion of those with minimal accomplishments at their last Foundation stage of schooling (Curriculum guidance for the foundation stage, 2012 ; Browne, 2013). Therefore, this presents a “gap of achievement” attributed to lack of key components that promote infancy literacy (Glasgow and Skinner, 2013). Along with that line, the linguistic skills of children either in first or second language are somehow interrelated (Whitehurst and Lonigan, 2012; August et al., 2012; Verhoeven, Steenge and van Balkom, 2012). This proposal intends to investigate the literacy levels of children with EAL. It is built on previous researches on the considerable variance in socio-cultural factors and backgrounds of children with EAL (Clarke, 2013). Research Methods A twenty-item questionnaire will be prepared and then be distributed to EAL students at random in different classrooms. Thirty EAL students, their families, and four teachers will participate in this research. This will establish the respondent’s profile
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