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PYROLYSIS PRESENTATION.pptx - INTRODUCTI ON Pyrolysis the...

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INTRODUCTI ON
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Pyrolysis the thermal decomposition of biomass occurring in the absence of oxygen. This reaction involves molecular breakdown of larger molecules into smaller molecules in presence of heat. Pyro = heat. Lysis = break down. It differs from combustion in that it occurs in the absence of air. In practice, it is not possible to achieve a completely oxygen-free atmosphere. Because some oxygen is present in any pyrolysis system, a small amount of oxidation occurs. The products of biomass pyrolysis include biochar, bio-oil and gases including methane, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide.
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PYROLYSIS FEEDSTOCK
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Feedstock for pyrolysis Many sources of organic matter can be used as feedstock for pyrolysis. Suitable plant material includes greenwaste, sawdust, waste wood, woody weeds; and agricultural sources including nut shells, straw, cotton trash, rice hulls, switch grass; and animal waste including poultry litter, dairy manure, and potentially other manures. Pyrolysis is used as a form of thermal treatment to reduce waste volumes of domestic refuse . Some industrial byproducts are also suitable feedstock including paper sludge and distillers grain.
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Feedstocks for Fast Pyrolysis Any Organic Material Pretreatment: sorting Qualifications: none Feedstocks for Slow Pyrolysis Any Organic Material Pretreatment: sorting Qualifications: Waste must be pre-sorted and processed to <6 mm (1 to 2 mm. preferred) and <10% moisture content to assure high heat transfer rate.
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benefits of feedstock 1. Feedstock production and collection : If the feedstock is a residue, such as municipal biomass waste, logging or cropping residues, or a by-product such as bagasse, then production is less an economic issue than if the feedstock is purposely grown for the production of biochar. 2. Use Tradeof : This would include the potential nutrient value lost from using feedstock for biochar production rather than as a direct fertilizer on the field. How this trade off works will vary on the area and on the feedstock. For example, chicken litter may be valuable in some areas as a direct fertilizer while in other areas it may be treated as a waste and represent a disposal cost.
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