{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

addiction a choice.docx - AddictionIsaChoice,NotaDisease...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Addiction Is a Choice, Not a Disease   Addiction , 2014 From Opposing Viewpoints in Context   "Brain changes occur as a matter of everyday life; the brain can be changed by the  choice  to think or  behave differently." In the following viewpoint, Steven Slate argues that the brain disease concept of   addiction   is false  because the evidence provided by disease proponents—brain scans showing abnormal changes in  neuronal pathways and circuitry—does not hold up to scrutiny. Slate maintains that changes in the brain  are perfectly normal and can actually occur through one's own volition. Steven Slate, a former substance  abuser, is the author of the website   The Clean Slate Addiction Site . He works in research and  development with the Baldwin Research Institute in New York City. As you read, consider the following questions: 1. According to Steven Slate, various areas of the brain grow and expand or become less active  depending on the amount of use. What is the term that refers to this ability of the brain to change its  structure? 2. The author contends that physical activity can rewire the brains circuits, but does he believe that  thoughts alone can also affect the brain? 3. If the brain can be changed into an addicted state, is it possible to reverse the changes,  according to the author? In a true disease, some part of the body is in a state of abnormal physiological functioning, and this  causes the undesirable symptoms. In the case of cancer, it would be mutated cells which we point to as  evidence of a physiological abnormality; in diabetes we can point to low insulin production or cells which  fail to use insulin properly as the physiological abnormality which create the harmful symptoms. If a  person has either of these diseases, they cannot directly choose to stop their symptoms or directly  choose to stop the abnormal physiological functioning that creates the symptoms. They can only choose  to stop the physiological abnormality indirectly, by the application of medical treatment, and in the case of  diabetes, dietetic measures may also indirectly halt the symptoms as well (but such measures are not a  cure so much as a lifestyle adjustment necessitated by permanent physiological malfunction). Brain Scans as Proof That Addiction Is a Disease In addiction, there is no such physiological malfunction. The best physical evidence put forward by the  disease proponents falls totally flat on the measure of representing a physiological malfunction. This  evidence is the much touted brain scan. The organization responsible for putting forth these brain scans, 
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}