Chapter 4(1).pptx - MCSA Guide to Installing and...

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1 MCSA Guide to Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012/R2, Exam 70-410 Chapter 4 Configuring Server Storage
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2 Objectives Describe server storage Configure local disks Work with virtual disks Use Storage Spaces
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3 An Overview of Server Storage The need for faster, bigger, and more reliable storage is growing as fast as the technology can keep up The following sections cover some basics of server storage: - What it is - Why you need it - Common methods for accessing storage
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4 What is Storage? Generally, storage is considered any medium data can be written to and retrieved from Long-term storage includes: - USB memory sticks (flash drives) - Secure Digital (SD) cards and Compact Flash (CF) - CDs and DVDs - Magnetic tape - Solid state drives - Hard disk drives
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5 What is Storage? Server storage is based on hard disk drives (HDDs) - Although solid state drives are gaining popularity Solid state drive (SSD) - uses flash memory and the same type of high-speed interfaces as traditional hard disks - Usually uses SATA or SATA Express interfaces - Has no moving parts, requires less power, and is faster and more resistant to shock than HDD - Do not have the capacity of HDDs
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6 Reasons for Storage Operating system files - the OS itself requires a good bit of storage Page file - used as virtual memory and to store dump data after a system crash Log files - change size dynamically depending on how system is used Virtual machines - need space to store file for virtual hard disks Database storage - disk storage requirements vary User documents - might be the largest use of disk space
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7 Storage Access Methods Four broad categories of storage access methods: - Local storage - Direct-attached storage (DAS) - Network-attached storage (NAS) - Storage area network (SAN)
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8 Local Storage Local storage - storage media with a direct, exclusive connection to the computer’s system board through a disk controller - Almost always inside the computer’s case - Usually refers to HDDs or SDDs instead of CD/DVDs - Provides rapid and exclusive access Disadvantage: only the system where it’s installed has direct access to the storage medium
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9 Direct-Attached Storage Direct-attached storage (DAS) - similar to local storage but can also refer to one or more HDDs in an enclosure with its own power supply A DAS device with its own enclosure and power supply can usually be configured as a disk array - Such as a RAID configuration Some DAS have multiple interfaces so that more than one computer can access the storage medium simultaneously
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10 Network-Attached Storage Network-attached storage (NAS) - has an enclosure, power supply, slots for multiple HDDs, a network interface, and a built-in OS tailored for managing shared storage - Sometimes referred to as a storage appliance NAS is typically dedicated to file sharing NAS shares files through standard network protocols such as: - Server Message Block(SMB), Network File System (NFS), and File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
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11 Storage Area Network
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