ConnotationActivitiesassignmentspractice.pdf

ConnotationActivitiesassignmentspractice.pdf - Word...

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Word Choice (Denotation and Connotation) In argumentative writing, as in an editorial, authors choose their words carefully in order to best convince the audience of his/her point of view. They try to pick the most precise words to create the proper tone for their message. The way they achieve this effect is to write with words that have attached to them certain denotations and connotations. Denotation -Dictionary, literal meaning of words Connotation -Common associations that people make with words (positive or negative) Example Word: Gray Denotation -Color of any shade between the colors of black and white Connotation -Negative, Gloom, Sadness, Old Age Practice Word: Mustang Denotation- Small, wild horse of the North American Plains Connotation -Positive, strong, fast, sleek, beautiful The connotation of the word is why Ford carmakers would choose to name one of its models “Mustang.” Think of two currently used automobile names. What are the denotations of the words? What connotations did the manufacturer hope to evoke in naming that car that particular name? What details do the names bring to mind? What does the name tell you about who drives the car, how fast it is, and what its features are?
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Denotation and Connotation Practice Car #1 Car #2 Automobile Name: Denotation: Connotations: What name tells you about driver, speed, features of car: Now think of a car and color that describe you. Be prepared to share your response with the class. Car: Features of car that are similar to you: Color: Reason for color of car:
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Connotation Practice Words with similar dictionary meanings often have different connotations, so it is very important for a writer to choose words carefully. Consider the following table. Each row contains a list of words with similar dictionary meanings but different shades of feeling. Neutral Favorable (Positive) Unfavorable (Negative) 1. Inactive 2. Shy 3. Funny 4. Old 5. Reserved 6. Persistent 7. New 8. Conservative 9. Proud 10. Curious POSSIBLE ANSWERS TEACHER KEY: Neutral Favorable Unfavorable inactive relaxed lazy shy modest mousy funny Good-humored sarcastic old time-tested out-of-date reserved dignified stiff-necked persistent persevering stubborn new up-to-date newfangled conservative thrifty miserly proud self-confident conceited curious inquisitive nosy
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Loaded Words Practice Directions: Imagine you are writing a letter to someone in which you feel your words will save their life. Change the following words/phrases to have the most persuasive effect on your reader by using the most extreme/loaded words.
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