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War Horse.docx - Evolution of Puppetry When we watch movies...

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Evolution of Puppetry When we watch movies that include special effects, like Jurassic World, we are in awe of how the dinosaurs seem so realistic, but at the same time the actors makes it more realistic by their interaction with the dinosaurs. It took us time and development to have special effects to look so real compared to the past. Before we admire the special effects used in movies, let’s go back further in time when entertainment was made for stage. In the past, we would go to plays or broadways for our amusement. We didn’t have computers to do the job of the special effects, instead many times puppets were used. Using puppets for special effects makes it more challenging to impress us because they don’t seem realistic. What makes it seem alive is how it’s done and how the actors interact with the puppets. Like movies, puppets gradually improve and become more realistic but it had to start somewhere. What’s a good example of a play that included puppetry as its special effects? The first one that would come to my mind is War Horse. It’s known for its mastery of puppetry, leaving people in awe because the way they did it, it seemed so real. Today, we’re about to learn the story of how War Horse came to be through puppetry by studying on the ancestor of the War Horse puppet, how it was done and what it takes for it to stand out. War Horse is a heartfelt story of a boy who becomes attached to a horse that ends up being sent away to the war. Soon the boy joins the army only to be reunited with the horse again.
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