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PICT103 Module 12.pptx

PICT103 Module 12.pptx - PICT103 Introduction to...

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Dr James Martin Week 12 – Crimes of the Powerful PICT103: Introduction to Criminology
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Comparing the harm The entire worldwide annual homicide rate is estimated at approximately 468,000 (UNODC 2011) Workplace deaths number around 2.2 million – nearly 4 times more than all deaths resulting from homicide (ILO 2005) The vast majority of these deaths are not the result of unavoidable accident, but rather criminal negligence Yet criminal convictions are rarely associated with the bulk of these deaths Homicides worldwide 468,000 Workplace deaths 2,200,000
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Who is more dangerous ?
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Lecture outline I. White collar & corporate crime Definitions – what are they? Who are the offenders? Harms – who do they hurt? II. Radical criminology Basic principles Neoliberalism III. State crime Definitions & examples International law Non-state approaches
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Part I White Collar and Corporate crime
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What is white collar crime? Key theorist – Edwin Sutherland (1883-1950) ‘... a crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation (Sutherland 1949:9). Opportunities for criminal activity presented by and within work environment Is a feature of the act (crime) not the actor (offender)
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Types of white collar crime Embezzlement Employee pilfering and theft Fraud (real estate, insurance, tax, investment, etc.) Computer crime (theft of identity or information) Insider trading White collar crimes often violate a combination of: Civil laws Criminal laws Administrative rules
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What is corporate crime? Offences and acts of omission or commission by corporations ‘Corporate crime involves offences committed by companies or their agents against members of the public, the environment, creditors, investors or corporate competitors.’ ( Grabowsky and Braithwaite, 1997: 2) Organisational rather than individual Not necessarily for direct profit – other motivations include organisational/ team prestige, corporate culture, urge to ‘win’, etc.
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Types of corporate crime Abuse of power, fraud and economic exploitation that result in:
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