English Essay.pdf - Bravo 1 Filiberto Bravo 4 April 2016...

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Bravo 1 Filiberto Bravo 4 April 2016 Eng 102—Davis Analyze Movie Tactics of Persuasion Are ordinary citizens capable of making complex, judicial decisions or are their opinions flawed by preconception and an inability to see beyond the obvious? In Sidney Lumet’s 12 Angry Men , a group of twelve jurors must decide whether a young man is responsible for killing his own father. Eleven of the male jurors, in a rush to leave, hastily choose a “guilty” verdict. If they reach a unanimous decision, the accused man will receive the death penalty. Juror 8, however, is sensitive, logical, and most of all, unwilling to make a decision about the man’s guilt until discussing the case. As Juror 8 forces his peers to reconsider the evidence, he slowly points out inconsistences within the case. Eventually, after much coaxing, Juror 8 convinces all eleven jurors to change their verdict to “not guilty,” in turn setting a young man free. From his body language to his tone, objectivity, and phronesis, Juror 8 skillfully persuades eleven stubborn men to reevaluate their opinion and the basis upon which they reached a verdict. Vital to his role as the levelheaded character, Juror 8’s body language throughout the film helps attract the support of other jurors as he lobbies to review the case. As the jury room scene begins, the men chat with each other; some talk about sports while others discuss financials. They appear to be happy and even joke about their responsibility to vote “guilty” or “not guilty.” Juror 8, however, peers through the window and makes no effort to engage in conversation. He stands several feet away from the rest of men and has his back turned towards them while his shoulders remain parallel with window. When approached by another juror wanting to make
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Bravo 2 small talk, Juror 8 does not turn his body to face the man; instead, he keeps his body faced towards the window and continues to peer out. From the very beginning, Juror 8’s body language makes it clear he is not there to socialize or have a good time. By not engaging in conversation, Juror 8 not only appears to be reflective about the decision he is forced to make, but sets the precedent for him to become the leader of the group of men. When the jurors take their first vote, Juror 8 is instantly criticized by men, with one juror exclaiming, “boy, oh boy, there’s always one” (11:58-12:02). As the men make jabs at Juror 8’s stance, he remains calm; he leaves his
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