chpter3.docx - The War of Independence of Texas or Texas...

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The War of Independence of Texas or Texas Revolution took place between October 2, 1835 and April 21, 1836. The parties to the conflict were Mexico and the province of Texas, owned at the time the State of Coahuila and Texas. The problems between the Mexican government and Anglo settlers in Texas began with the enactment of the centralist constitution of 1835, known as the Seven Laws. This new legislation, enacted by Mexican President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, expunged the old Federal Constitution of 1824. Shortly thereafter, there were uprisings in several regions of the country. The war began in Texas territory the October 2, 1835, the Battle of Gonzales. Quickly, the Texan forces took San Antonio Bay and the current Béjar San Antonio, but a few months later would be defeated. The panic of 1819 plunged the United States into a severe economic depression. A businessman named Moses Austin lost its leadership in manufacturing businesses during this time. After a trip to Texas, a project designed to attract American settlers to the region, which would help Spain colonizers still in the region to develop the territory, helping to take a big leap in his career as a businessman. In 1820 he applied for a Spanish grant to seat 300 white families in Texas territory .Your son, Stephen F. Austin, helped to get people ready for this adventure. In late 1820, Moses Austin received the award of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, but died in June of the following year. Stephen F. Austin inherited the concession granted to his father and formally began colonization. Due to the US economic crisis, he had no trouble finding the 300 families stipulated in the agreement.
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