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Who to blame.docx - RUNNING HEAD WHOS TO BLAME Whos to...

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RUNNING HEAD: WHO’S TO BLAME? 1 Who’s to Blame? Jessica Krause PSY 304: Lifespan Development Kendra Jackson August 14, 2017
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WHO’S TO BLAME? 2 There are many factors that come into play with the way a child grows up and how they succeed or fail in the things that they set forth to do. The question that comes to mind is, how much credit or blame do parents deserve for the way we are? Several different factors could be described in this question. How the child was raised, was it a 2-parent household, was their emotional support for the child or even was the parents even present in the child’s life, such as was the child in foster care. These factors, plus many more could be reasons for a child’s success or failure. Per Clarke (2006), co mplex research evidence is transformed into a set of target outcomes for Sure Start resulting in a policy that at national level promotes a view of mothers as principally responsible for children's development and well-being, and risks sliding into a moral discourse of social exclusion that blames parents for poor outcomes . Clarke felt that mothers were the ones that were principally responsible for the development and well-being of the child. To me, it could be either the mother or the father. Depending on how the household is made up. I know that my husband and I switched roles, where I went from being a stay at home mother, to a working mother and he went to become a stay at home dad due to an injury. Our youngest son was 2 years old at the time, and I feel that sometimes it is my fault that he isn’t developmentally on par with his classmates, but then I must remember that he is autistic. Clarke believed that it is the mother’s primary responsibility to make sure that the child does right and doesn’t do wrong. What if the child doesn’t live with their mother? Can this be disputed? Can the father be the primary one to discuss whether the child does right or wrong? I do feel that it can be disputed, especially if the mother isn’t present in the child’s life. Even if it is another caregiver, they should be the ones to discuss whether the child does right or wrong.
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WHO’S TO BLAME? 3 Rowe (1990), asked the question do parents really deserve so much blame for children who turn out poorly, or so much credit for children who turn out well? Perhaps how the twig is
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