You are John Marshall.docx - You are John Marshall You...

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You are John Marshall. You served in the Continental Army as a CPT during the American Revolutionary War and were friends with George Washington and endured the brutal winter conditions at Valley Forge (1777–1778). You are a stalwart Federalist and favor a strong central government and a nemesis of the Jeffersonian school of government. You were Secretary of State under John Adams June 13, 1800 – March 4, 1801. When the Federalists were soundly defeated and about to lose both the executive and legislative branches to Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans, President Adams and the lame duck Congress passed what came to be known as the Judiciary Act of 1801, a.k.a. the Midnight Judges Act , which made sweeping changes to the federal judiciary, including a reduction in the number of Justices from six to five so as to deny Jefferson an appointment until two vacancies occurred. President Adams surprised you and nominated you to be Chief Justice and you accepted the nomination immediately. You were confirmed by the Senate on January 27, 1801, and received your commission on January 31, 1801. In essence, you were a Midnight judge yourself! While you officially took office on February 4, at the request of the President you continued to serve as Secretary of State until Adams' term expired on March 4. You administered the Oath of Office to your nemesis, Jefferson on 4 March 1801 at the new Capitol in Washington DC. You are aware that many Federalists politicians were appointed to judicial office in the waning days of the Adams administration. One of them, William Marbury’s commission as justice of the peace for DC, had been signed by President Adams following senate confirmation on 3 March, 1801, Adam’s last day in office. As Secretary of State, you placed the Seal of the United States on the letter of commission and it was ready for delivery to Mr. Marbury. You gave it to your brother, James to deliver it. 1
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You are James Marshall. You are the knucklehead brother of John Marshall. John gave you some of the commissions including Marbury’s but you failed to deliver them to the judges/JPs. You are the reason why we are all here today studying this case. When asked what you did with Marbury’s commission, you better have a good story why you failed to deliver it! 2
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You are Thomas Jefferson. Your term as President was March 4, 1801 – March 4, 1809. You were sworn in by Chief Justice John Marshall at the new Capitol in Washington DC. The United States Presidential election of 1800 has been called the "Revolution of 1800." You defeated John Adams . The election was a realigning election that ushered in a generation of Democratic-Republican Party rule and the eventual demise of the Federalist Party . It was a long, bitter re-match of the 1796 election between the pro-French and pro-decentralization Democratic-Republicans under Jefferson, against incumbent Adams's pro-British and pro- centralization Federalists. The chief political issues included opposition to the tax imposed by
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