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University Writing Readings in Human Rights Fall 2017 (2) (3).pdf

University Writing Readings in Human Rights Fall 2017 (2) (3).pdf

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Unformatted text preview: 1 University​ ​Writing:​ ​Readings​ ​in​ ​Human​ ​Rights ENGL​ ​CC1010.402​ ​|​ ​Fall​ ​2017 T/R​ ​2:40​ ​pm​ ​-​ ​3:50​ ​pm 502​ ​Northwest​ ​Corner​ ​Building Instructor:​ ​Kevin​ ​Windhauser Email:​ ​[email protected] Office​ ​Hours:​ ​T:​ ​4:00​ ​pm​ ​-​ ​5:00​ ​pm;​ ​W:​ ​4:00​ ​pm​ ​-​ ​5:00​ ​pm Mailbox/Office:​ ​310​ ​Philosophy​ ​Hall​ ​(Writing​ ​Center) Syllabus​ ​Contents 1. Course​ ​Description 2. Course​ ​Requirements a. Assignments b. Formatting c. Required​ ​Texts d. Other​ ​Texts​ ​and​ ​Online​ ​Resources 3. Course​ ​Policies a. Attendance i. Excused​ ​Absences ii. Unexcused​ ​Absences b. Lateness c. Computers,​ ​Phones,​ ​and​ ​other​ ​Technology d. Conferences​ ​and​ ​Office​ ​Hours e. Assessment​ ​and​ ​Comments f. Essay​ ​Grading g. Late​ ​and​ ​Missed​ ​Assignments h. Final​ ​Grades i. Participation j. Academic​ ​Integrity​ ​and​ ​Plagiarism 4. ​ ​ ​Resources a. Writing​ ​Center b. Accommodations​ ​for​ ​Students​ ​with​ ​Disabilities c. Counseling​ ​and​ ​Psychological​ ​Services d. Office​ ​of​ ​Multicultural​ ​Affairs e. Support​ ​for​ ​Survivors​ ​of​ ​Sexual​ ​Assault,​ ​Violence,​ ​and​ ​Harassment f. First-Generation​ ​Low-Income​ ​Partnership 5. Itinerary 2 a. Course​ ​Readings b. Course​ S​ chedule Course​ ​Description Welcome​ ​to​ ​University​ ​Writing:​ ​Readings​ ​in​ ​Human​ ​Rights.​ ​University​ ​Writing​ ​is​ ​designed​ ​to​ ​help undergraduates​ ​read​ ​and​ ​write​ ​essays​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​participate​ ​in​ ​the​ ​academic​ ​conversations​ ​that​ ​form our​ ​intellectual​ ​community.​ ​We​ ​will​ ​give​ ​special​ ​attention​ ​to​ ​the​ ​practices​ ​of​ ​close​ ​reading,​ ​rhetorical analysis,​ ​research,​ ​collaboration,​ ​and​ ​revision.​ ​Students​ ​will​ ​learn​ ​that​ ​writing​ ​is​ ​a​ ​process​ ​of continual​ ​refinement​ ​of​ ​ideas​ ​and​ ​their​ ​expression.​ ​Rather​ ​than​ ​approaching​ ​writing​ ​as​ ​an​ ​innate talent,​ ​this​ ​course​ ​will​ ​teach​ ​writing​ ​as​ ​a​ ​unique,​ ​learned​ ​skill​ ​that​ ​can​ ​be​ ​practiced​ ​and​ ​developed. Over​ ​the​ ​course​ ​of​ ​the​ ​semester,​ ​you​ ​will​ ​read​ ​and​ ​discuss​ ​texts​ ​from​ ​a​ ​number​ ​of​ ​fields,​ ​complete regular​ ​informal​ ​reading​ ​and​ ​writing​ ​exercises,​ ​write​ ​several​ ​longer​ ​essays,​ ​and​ ​prepare​ ​an​ ​editorial for​ ​a​ ​public​ ​audience. This​ ​is​ ​a​ ​themed​ ​section​ ​of​ ​University​ ​Writing,​ ​and​ ​therefore​ ​both​ ​our​ ​reading​ ​and​ ​writing​ ​will​ ​work to​ ​explore​ ​the​ ​interpretive​ ​problems,​ ​intellectual​ ​questions,​ ​and​ ​academic​ ​conversations​ ​surrounding issues​ ​of​ ​human​ ​rights.​ ​We​ ​will​ ​not​ ​take​ ​up​ ​questions​ ​that​ ​have​ ​easy​ ​answers,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​readings​ ​we​ ​do together​ ​will​ ​be​ ​designed​ ​not​ ​to​ ​provide​ ​conclusions,​ ​but​ ​to​ ​provoke​ ​further​ ​exploration.​ ​Among the​ ​questions​ ​we​ ​explore​ ​will​ ​be​ ​the​ ​following: ● Is​ ​there​ ​such​ ​a​ ​thing​ ​as​ ​“human​ ​rights”​ ​at​ ​all?​ ​If​ ​there​ ​is,​ ​where​ ​do​ ​they​ ​come​ ​from?​ ​Are human​ ​rights​ ​fixed,​ ​or​ ​can​ ​different​ ​cultures,​ ​time​ ​periods,​ ​and​ ​political​ ​bodies​ ​change​ ​them? ● How​ ​are​ ​human​ ​rights​ ​preserved​ ​and​ ​enforced?​ ​Does​ ​the​ ​idea​ ​of​ ​human​ ​rights​ ​currently improve​ ​human​ ​lives? ● What​ ​relationship​ ​does​ ​language​ ​have​ ​to​ ​human​ ​rights?​ ​What​ ​role,​ ​if​ ​any,​ ​does​ ​the intellectual​ ​community​ ​play​ ​in​ ​creating,​ ​defending,​ ​and​ ​expanding​ ​human​ ​rights? Because​ ​the​ ​material​ ​we​ ​read​ ​in​ ​this​ ​class​ ​concerns​ ​human​ ​rights​ ​and​ ​their​ ​abuses,​ ​it​ ​will​ ​in​ ​all likelihood​ ​resonate​ ​differently​ ​for​ ​each​ ​member​ ​of​ ​our​ ​class.​ ​Therefore,​ ​I​ ​ask​ ​that​ ​at​ ​all​ ​times​ ​you​ ​be respectful,​ ​kind,​ ​and​ ​patient​ ​with​ ​your​ ​classmates​ ​as​ ​we​ ​wade​ ​into​ ​these​ ​difficult​ ​issues​ ​together. Some​ ​of​ ​this​ ​material​ ​may​ ​be​ ​triggering;​ ​if​ ​at​ ​any​ ​point​ ​you​ ​feel​ ​a​ ​personal​ ​need​ ​to​ ​leave​ ​the​ ​room during​ ​class,​ ​you​ ​are​ ​welcome​ ​to​ ​do​ ​so.​ ​I​ ​am​ ​happy​ ​to​ ​talk​ ​with​ ​you​ ​at​ ​any​ ​time​ ​about​ ​these difficulties,​ ​and​ ​please​ ​make​ ​use​ ​of​ ​the​ ​resources​ ​listed​ ​in​ ​this​ ​syllabus​ ​if​ ​you​ ​need​ ​additional support. Note:​ ​Your​ ​syllabus​ ​is​ ​a​ ​reference​ ​document​ ​to​ ​be​ ​frequently​ ​consulted.​ ​ ​In​ ​it​ ​you​ ​will​ ​find​ ​course policies,​ ​all​ ​major​ ​due​ ​dates,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​schedule​ ​of​ ​readings.​ ​This​ ​syllabus​ ​is​ ​also​ ​available​ ​on​ ​the Courseworks​ ​site.​ ​To​ ​get​ ​started,​ ​log​ ​in​ ​to​ ​[http://Courseworks.columbia.edu]. 3 Course​ ​Requirements Successful​ ​completion​ ​of​ ​University​ ​Writing​ ​entails: ● Complete​ ​four​ ​revised​ ​essays​ ​ranging​ ​from​ ​750-3000​ ​words,​ ​each​ ​accompanied​ ​by​ ​at​ ​least​ ​one draft​.​ ​ Students​ ​must​ ​submit​ ​all​ ​four​ ​final​ ​essays​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​pass​ ​the​ ​class. ● Attend​ ​and​ ​participate​ ​in​ ​all​ ​classes​ ​and​ ​required​ ​conferences. ● Prepare​ ​reading​ ​and​ ​writing​ ​exercises​ ​as​ ​assigned. ● Submit​ ​all​ ​of​ ​your​ ​writing​ ​assignments​ ​on​ ​Courseworks. Assignments ● You​ ​will​ ​do​ ​at​ ​least​ ​three​ ​types​ ​of​ ​writing​ ​in​ ​this​ ​course:​ ​exercises,​ ​drafts​,​ ​and​ ​final​ ​essays​.​ ​These assignments​ ​will​ ​connect​ ​with​ ​one​ ​another​ ​in​ ​a​ ​developmental​ ​sequence​ ​called​ ​a​ ​progression. ● Exercises:​ ​(100-400​ ​words)​ ​Exercises​ ​will​ ​help​ ​you​ ​develop​ ​skills​ ​and​ ​ideas​ ​as​ ​you​ ​work toward​ ​your​ ​essay​ ​draft ● Drafts​ ​and​ ​proposals:​ ​(750+​ ​words)​ ​You​ ​will​ ​write​ ​one​ ​or​ ​more​ ​drafts​ ​prior​ ​to​ ​submitting​ ​a final​ ​version​ ​of​ ​your​ ​essay​ ​for​ ​a​ ​progression.​ ​The​ ​stronger​ ​the​ ​draft​ ​at​ ​any​ ​stage​ ​of composing,​ ​the​ ​more​ ​useful​ ​will​ ​be​ ​the​ ​feedback​ ​you​ ​receive. ● Final​ ​essays:​ ​(750+​ ​words;​ ​must​ ​have​ ​a​ ​title,​ ​word​ ​count,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​works​ ​cited​ ​page)​ ​A​ ​final essay​ ​is​ ​the​ ​most​ ​public​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​writing​ ​you​ ​will​ ​produce​ ​for​ ​this​ ​course.​ ​Your​ ​essay​ ​should aim​ ​to​ ​persuade​ ​astute,​ ​interested​ ​readers​ ​who​ ​are​ ​unfamiliar​ ​with​ ​the​ ​texts​ ​you​ ​engage;​ ​you need​ ​to​ ​convince​ ​them​ ​of​ ​why​ ​your​ ​argument​ ​is​ ​significant.​ ​Final​ ​essays​ ​should​ ​adhere​ ​to MLA​ ​style. Formatting All​ ​writing​ ​submitted​ ​in​ ​this​ ​class​ ​should​ ​following​ ​these​ ​formatting​ ​conventions: ● Double-spaced​ ​text,​ ​using​ ​12-point​ ​font,​ ​with​ ​one-inch​ ​page​ ​margins ● A​ ​header​ ​on​ ​the​ ​first​ ​page​ ​only,​ ​which​ ​includes​ ​your​ ​name,​ ​the​ ​course​ ​title,​ ​my​ ​name,​ ​the date,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​word​ ​count ● Drafts​ ​and​ ​final​ ​essays​ ​should​ ​include​ ​a​ ​title.​ ​Exercises​ ​do​ ​not​ ​need​ ​a​ ​title ● All​ ​essays​ ​should​ ​have​ ​page​ ​numbers ● All​ ​citations​ ​must​ ​follow​ ​MLA​ ​format.​ ​See​ ​the​ ​Online​ ​Resources​ ​section​ ​of​ ​the​ ​syllabus​ ​for more​ ​information​ ​on​ ​using​ ​MLA​ ​format. Required​ ​Texts The​ ​syllabus,​ ​course​ ​description,​ ​requirements,​ ​readings,​ ​assignments,​ ​and​ ​links​ ​to​ ​resources​ ​are available​ ​on​ ​CourseWorks:​​ ​https://courseworks.columbia.edu/ Additional​ ​readings​ ​will​ ​be​ ​assigned​ ​from​ ​The​ ​Morningside​ ​Review​,​ ​morningsidereview.org​,​ ​which​ ​is​ ​the journal​ ​of​ ​selected​ ​essays​ ​from​ ​Columbia’s​ ​Undergraduate​ ​Writing​ ​Program. 4 Please​ ​note:​ ​Although​ ​the​ ​readings​ ​for​ ​this​ ​course​ ​will​ ​be​ ​posted​ ​online,​ ​I​ ​will​ ​require​ ​you​ ​to​ ​bring​ ​a paper​ ​copy​ ​of​ ​each​ ​reading​ ​to​ ​class​ ​with​ ​you.​ ​This​ ​will​ ​better​ ​facilitate​ ​class​ ​discussion. Optional​ ​Text: Hacker,​ ​Diana.​ ​A​ ​Pocket​ ​Style​ ​Manual​.​ ​7th​​ ​ ​Edition.​ ​Available​ ​at​ ​the​ ​University​ ​Bookstore. As​ ​a​ ​student​ ​at​ ​Columbia,​ ​you​ ​can​ ​download​ ​bibliographic​ ​software​ ​that​ ​will​ ​archive​ ​and​ ​organize your​ ​textual​ ​references​ ​and​ ​generate​ ​formatted​ ​citations​ ​in​ ​many​ ​formats.​ ​ You​ ​can​ ​download​ ​one​ ​of those​ ​programs​ ​from​ ​CUIT:​​ ​http://library.columbia.edu/research/citation-management.html I​ ​recommend​ ​consulting​ ​the​ ​MLA​ ​Handbook​ ​(Eighth​ ​Edition)​ ​if​ ​you​ ​have​ ​questions​ ​about​ ​proper formatting.​ ​There​ ​will​ ​be​ ​an​ ​online​ ​MLA​ ​style​ ​guide​ ​posted​ ​on​ ​Courseworks​ ​for​ ​your​ ​convenience. As​ ​a​ ​Columbia​ ​student,​ ​you​ ​can​ ​download​ ​citation​ ​management​ ​software​ ​for​ ​your​ ​computer​ ​that will​ ​archive​ ​and​ ​organize​ ​your​ ​references​ ​and​ ​generate​ ​formatted​ ​citations.​ ​I​ ​highly​ ​recommend​ ​this as​ ​a​ ​means​ ​for​ ​organizing​ ​and​ ​storing​ ​research​ ​material;​ ​it​ ​will​ ​likely​ ​be​ ​useful​ ​to​ ​you​ ​throughout your​ ​time​ ​here.​ ​Information​ ​about​ ​these​ ​programs​ ​and​ ​links​ ​to​ ​download​ ​them​ ​is​ ​available​ ​from CUIT:​ ​http://library.columbia.edu/research/citation-management.html Course​ ​Policies Attendance The​ ​discussion​ ​and​ ​workshop​ ​elements​ ​that​ ​are​ ​at​ ​the​ ​center​ ​of​ ​this​ ​course​ ​cannot​ ​be​ ​made​ ​up,​ ​so attendance​ ​is​ ​vital.​ ​ In​ ​accordance​ ​with​ ​Columbia​ ​University​ ​regulations,​ ​there​ ​will​ ​be​ ​distinctions​ ​made​ ​between excused​ ​absences​ ​and​ ​unexcused​ ​absences.​ ​Excused​ ​absences​ ​due​ ​to​ ​religious​ ​observance,​ ​athletic commitments​ ​(e.g.​ ​away​ ​games),​ ​and​ ​illness​ ​will​ ​not​ ​incur​ ​a​ ​grade​ ​penalty​ ​providing​ ​that​ ​proper documentation​ ​is​ ​submitted​ ​correctly.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​first​ ​two​ ​weeks​ ​of​ ​class,​ ​students​ ​will​ ​also​ ​not​ ​be penalized​ ​if​ ​they​ ​have​ ​been​ ​attending​ ​a​ ​different​ ​section​ ​of​ ​University​ ​Writing​ ​and​ ​elect​ ​to​ ​change their​ ​section.​ ​Please​ ​see​ ​the​ ​specific​ ​requirements​ ​below​ ​for​ ​how​ ​you​ ​should​ ​document​ ​absences​ ​you wish​ ​to​ ​be​ ​excused. Excused​ ​Absences Excused​ ​absences​ ​include​ ​religious​ ​observance,​ ​athletic​ ​commitments,​ ​illness,​ ​and​ ​section​ ​changes. They​ ​may​ ​be​ ​documented​ ​as​ ​follows: ● Religious​ ​observance:​ ​By​ ​the​ ​fourth​ ​class​ ​session,​ ​send​ ​an​ ​email​ ​to​ ​your​ ​instructor—copied to​ ​your​ ​academic​ ​advisor—in​ ​which​ ​you​ ​outline​ ​all​ ​of​ ​the​ ​dates​ ​you​ ​will​ ​be​ ​absent​ ​for​ ​the semester.​ ​ Create​ ​a​ ​plan​ ​with​ ​your​ ​instructor​ ​to​ ​make​ ​up​ ​work​ ​or​ ​reschedule​ ​deadlines. ● Athletic​ ​commitments:​ ​Only​ ​participation​ ​in​ ​athletic​ ​competitions​ ​will​ ​count​ ​as​ ​excused absences;​ ​practice​ ​sessions​ ​do​ ​not.​ ​Prior​ ​to​ ​any​ ​absence,​ ​you​ ​must​ ​submit​ ​to​ ​your​ ​instructor a​ ​completed​ ​and​ ​signed​ ​“Columbia​ ​University​ ​Intercollegiate​ ​Athletics​ ​Academic​ ​Absence 5 Notification​ ​Form.”​ ​Create​ ​a​ ​plan​ ​with​ ​your​ ​instructor​ ​to​ ​make​ ​up​ ​work​ ​or​ ​reschedule deadlines.​ ​Here​ ​is​ ​a​ ​link​ ​to​ ​the​ ​form: http://www.college.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/intercollegiate_athletic_academic_abse nce_notification_form.pdf ● Illness:​ ​For​ ​an​ ​absence​ ​due​ ​to​ ​illness​ ​to​ ​count​ ​as​ ​excused,​ ​please​ ​provide​ ​a​ ​signed​ ​doctor’s note.​ ​You​ ​should​ ​bring​ ​the​ ​note​ ​to​ ​class​ ​on​ ​the​ ​day​ ​you​ ​are​ ​able​ ​to​ ​return.​ ​If​ ​you​ ​can,​ ​email your​ ​instructor​ ​to​ ​indicate​ ​that​ ​you​ ​will​ ​be​ ​unable​ ​to​ ​attend​ ​class. ● Section​ ​changes:​ ​If​ ​you​ ​change​ ​your​ ​section​ ​of​ ​University​ ​Writing​ ​in​ ​the​ ​first​ ​two​ ​weeks​ ​of class,​ ​you​ ​must​ ​provide​ ​your​ ​new​ ​instructor​ ​a​ ​completed​ ​and​ ​signed​ ​“University​ ​Writing Attendance​ ​Confirmation”​ ​form.​ ​Please​ ​see​ ​Mr.​ ​John​ ​Stobo​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Undergraduate​ ​Writing Program​ ​office,​ ​310​ ​Philosophy​ ​Hall,​ ​for​ ​a​ ​copy​ ​of​ ​the​ ​form. ● All​ ​other​ ​absences,​ ​including​ ​those​ ​due​ ​to​ ​late​ ​registration,​ ​are​ ​considered​ ​unexcused. Unexcused​ ​absences​ ​will​ ​affect​ ​your​ ​grade​ ​according​ ​to​ ​the​ ​chart​ ​below.​ ​Please​ ​also​ ​note​ ​the lateness​ ​policy​ ​in​ ​the​ ​next​ ​section​ ​to​ ​understand​ ​how​ ​latenesses​ ​count​ ​toward​ ​your​ ​total number​ ​of​ ​absences. Unexcused​ ​Absences All​ ​other​ ​absences,​ ​including​ ​those​ ​for​ ​late​ ​registration,​ ​will​ ​be​ ​considered​ ​unexcused,​ ​and​ ​will negatively​ ​affect​ ​your​ ​grade.​ ​I​ ​have​ ​provided​ ​a​ ​chart​ ​below​ ​explaining​ ​the​ ​impact​ ​of​ ​unexcused absences​ ​on​ ​your​ ​grade.​ ​Note:​ ​Please​ ​see​ ​the​ ​information​ ​in​ ​the​ ​“Lateness”​ ​section​ ​to​ ​understand how​ ​lateness​ ​affects​ ​your​ ​grade​ ​as​ ​well. Number​ ​of​ ​Unexcused​ ​Absences Grade​ ​Penalty 1-3​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​1/3​ ​of​ ​a​ ​letter,​ ​progression 4​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​1/3​ ​of​ ​a​ ​letter,​ ​course 5​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​1​ ​full​ ​letter,​ ​course 6​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ .​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​2​ ​full​ ​letters,​ ​course 7​ ​or​ ​more​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​F​ ​or​ ​UW,​ ​course​ ​grade Lateness Lateness​ ​disrupts​ ​class​ ​discussion​ ​and​ ​the​ ​learning​ ​of​ ​other​ ​students.​ ​Therefore,​ ​if​ ​you​ ​arrive​ ​once class​ ​is​ ​underway​ ​or​ ​leave​ ​before​ ​class​ ​has​ ​ended,​ ​you​ ​will​ ​be​ ​marked​ ​as​ ​late.​ ​Two​ ​latenesses​ ​count as​ ​one​ ​absence​ ​in​ ​calculating​ ​your​ ​final​ ​course​ ​grade. Conferences​ ​and​ ​Office​ ​Hours You​ ​will​ ​have​ ​two​ ​20-30​ ​minute​ ​conferences​ ​with​ ​me​ ​during​ ​the​ ​semester.​ ​These​ ​conferences​ ​give you​ ​the​ ​opportunity​ ​to​ ​discuss​ ​your​ ​ideas,​ ​to​ ​work​ ​through​ ​your​ ​drafts,​ ​to​ ​prepare​ ​for​ ​presentations, or​ ​to​ ​revise​ ​your​ ​essays.​ ​You​ ​are​ ​welcome​ ​to​ ​come​ ​and​ ​see​ ​me​ ​in​ ​office​ ​hours​ ​or​ ​by​ ​appointment​ ​to discuss​ ​any​ ​aspect​ ​of​ ​the​ ​course. Computer,​ ​Phones,​ ​and​ ​Other​ ​Technology 6 You​ ​are​ ​welcome​ ​to​ ​use​ ​laptops​ ​and​ ​tablets​ ​during​ ​class​ ​for​ ​the​ ​purposes​ ​of​ ​note-taking​ ​and​ ​select in-class​ ​exercises.​ ​However,​ ​these​ ​devices​ ​must​ ​remain​ ​closed​ ​at​ ​all​ ​other​ ​times​ ​during​ ​class,​ ​unless you​ ​have​ ​made​ ​other​ ​arrangements​ ​with​ ​me.​ ​The​ ​use​ ​of​ ​phones,​ ​however,​ ​is​ ​banned.​ ​Phones​ ​must be​ ​kept​ ​away​ ​from​ ​the​ ​class​ ​workplace​ ​(i.e.,​ ​not​ ​on​ ​the​ ​table​ ​or​ ​in​ ​your​ ​lap)​ ​and​ ​should​ ​be​ ​silenced. Any​ ​phone​ ​use​ ​during​ ​class​ ​will​ ​be​ ​considered​ ​an​ ​absence,​ ​and​ ​will​ ​affect​ ​your​ ​grade​ ​equivalently. Assessment​ ​and​ ​Response All​ ​of​ ​the​ ​writing​ ​you​ ​submit​ ​on​ ​time​ ​for​ ​this​ ​class​ ​will​ ​receive​ ​some​ ​sort​ ​of​ ​written​ ​or​ ​recorded response​ ​from​ ​me​ ​and/or​ ​your​ ​classmates.​ ​While​ ​writing​ ​exercises​ ​and​ ​preliminary​ ​drafts​ ​will​ ​not receive​ ​grades,​ ​they​ ​will​ ​be​ ​important​ ​for​ ​your​ ​development​ ​as​ ​a​ ​writer​ ​and​ ​thinker,​ ​and​ ​you​ ​are expected​ ​to​ ​complete​ ​them​ ​all. During​ ​the​ ​first​ ​three​ ​progressions,​ ​I​ ​will​ ​write​ ​marginal​ ​comments​ ​and​ ​typed​ ​end-comments​ ​to​ ​one preliminary​ ​draft​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​your​ ​final​ ​draft.​ ​For​ ​your​ ​final​ ​progression,​ ​you​ ​will​ ​receive end-comments​ ​on​ ​your​ ​final​ ​draft​ ​that​ ​respond​ ​to​ ​the​ ​essay​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​your​ ​development​ ​over​ ​the course​ ​of​ ​the​ ​semester. My​ ​comments​ ​are​ ​designed​ ​to​ ​help​ ​you​ ​assess​ ​your​ ​draft​ ​and​ ​prioritize​ ​goals​ ​for​ ​the​ ​next​ ​stage​ ​of your​ ​writing.​ ​Just​ ​as​ ​important,​ ​my​ ​comments​ ​will​ ​offer​ ​you​ ​practical​ ​strategies​ ​designed​ ​to​ ​further your​ ​ongoing​ ​development​ ​as​ ​a​ ​writer.​ ​ If​ ​you​ ​have​ ​any​ ​questions​ ​about​ ​my​ ​comments,​ ​please​ ​make an​ ​appointment​ ​with​ ​me​ ​to​ ​review​ ​them. Essay​ ​Grading Final​ ​essays​ ​will​ ​receive​ ​a​ ​letter​ ​grade,​ ​from​ ​A​ ​to​ ​F.​ ​The​ ​final​ ​course​ ​grade​ ​is​ ​computed​ ​on​ ​a​ ​4.0 scale. Each​ ​letter​ ​grade​ ​signifies​ ​the​ ​following: “A”​ ​essays​ ​fulfill​ ​the​ ​goals​ ​of​ ​the​ ​progression,​ ​but​ ​also​ ​push​ ​beyond​ ​those​ ​goals.​ ​This​ ​generally entails​ ​a​ ​compelling​ ​topic,​ ​persuasive​ ​argument,​ ​and​ ​careful​ ​attention​ ​to​ ​language​ ​and​ ​form.​ ​“A” essays​ ​reflect​ ​excellence​ ​and​ ​artistry. “B”​ ​essays​ ​come​ ​in​ ​two​ ​varieties:​ ​the​ ​“solid​ ​B”​ ​and​ ​the​ ​“striving​ ​B.”​ ​The​ ​solid​ ​B​ ​is​ ​a​ ​good, competent,​ ​paper.​ ​The​ ​striving​ ​B​ ​excels​ ​in​ ​certain​ ​areas,​ ​but​ ​is​ ​too​ ​uneven​ ​to​ ​receive​ ​an​ ​A.​ ​“B” essays​ ​show​ ​sufficient​ ​understanding​ ​of​ ​the​ ​progression’s​ ​goals. “C”​ ​essays​ ​reflect​ ​struggle​ ​in​ ​fulfilling​ ​the​ ​progression’s​ ​goals.​ ​The​ ​C​ ​essay​ ​often​ ​shows​ ​a​ ​fair amount​ ​of​ ​work,​ ​but​ ​it​ ​does​ ​not​ ​come​ ​together​ ​well​ ​enough​ ​to​ ​be​ ​a​ ​successful​ ​paper. “D”​ ​essays​ ​may​ ​appear​ ​to​ ​have​ ​been​ ​hastily​ ​written,​ ​incomplete,​ ​or​ ​thrown​ ​together. “F”​ ​essays​ ​fail​ ​to​ ​meet​ ​the​ ​minimum​ ​level​ ​of​ ​expectations​ ​for​ ​the​ ​progression. Late​ ​and​ ​Missed​ ​Assignments,​ ​Drafts,​ ​and​ ​Final​ ​Essays 7 Keeping​ ​deadlines​ ​is​ ​an​ ​important​ ​aspect​ ​of​ ​this​ ​class,​ ​as​ ​it​ ​gives​ ​you​ ​the​ ​time​ ​to​ ​develop​ ​and​ ​revise your​ ​ideas,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​gives​ ​me​ ​the​ ​time​ ​to​ ​offer​ ​you​ ​productive​ ​feedback.​ ​If​ ​you​ ​turn​ ​in​ ​work​ ​late,​ ​I​ ​may not​ ​be​ ​able​ ​to​ ​provide​ ​you​ ​feedback. Please​ ​complete​ ​all​ ​of​ ​your​ ​writing​ ​exercise​ ​on​ ​time,​ ​as​ ​missed​ ​exercises​ ​can​ ​impact​ ​the​ ​quality​ ​and grade​ ​of​ ​your​ ​essay. Feedback​ ​and​ ​revision​ ​are​ ​critical​ ​components​ ​of​ ​this​ ​class.​ ​If​ ​you​ ​do​ ​not​ ​hand​ ​in​ ​a​ ​preliminary​ ​draft at​ ​least​ ​48​ ​hours​ ​before​ ​the​ ​deadline​ ​of​ ​the​ ​final​ ​draft,​ ​your​ ​final​ ​essay​ ​grade​ ​will​ ​be​ ​lowered​ ​by​ ​one whole​ ​grade​ ​(e.g.​ ​from​ ​a​ ​B​ ​to​ ​a​ ​C).​ ​Your​ ​grade​ ​on​ ​the​ ​final​ ​essay​ ​will​ ​be​ ​lowered​ ​by​ ​1/3​ ​(e.g.​ ​from​ ​a B-​ ​to​ ​a​ ​C+)​ ​beginning​ ​the​ ​minute​ ​after​ ​its​ ​deadline.​ ​The​ ​grade​ ​will​ ​continue​ ​to​ ​go​ ​down​ ​by​ ​a​ ​third every​ ​24​ ​hours​ ​until​ ​the​ ​essay​ ​is​ ​submitted.​ ​All​ ​work​ ​must​ ​be​ ​submitted​ ​to​ ​Courseworks​ ​by​ ​the deadline​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​be​ ​considered​ ​on​ ​time.​ ​According​ ​to​ ​the​ ​policy​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Undergraduate​ ​Writing Program,​ ​failure​ ​to​ ​submit​ ​the​ ​final​ ​draft​ ​of​ ​any​ ​essay​ ​by​ ​the​ ​end​ ​of​ ​the​ ​semester​ ​will​ ​result​ ​in​ ​an automatic​ ​failure​ ​for​ ​the​ ​course. Final​ ​Grades Your​ ​semester​ ​grade​ ​will​ ​be​ ​calculated​ ​as​ ​follows: Progression​ ​1: Critical​ ​Response​ ​Essay​ ​(1200-1500​ ​words)​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​.​ ​....
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