Lab3.docx - Experiment 8 Newtons Second Law of Motion...

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Experiment 8: Newton’s Second Law of Motion Reported by: Sara Kessel Lab Partners: Wes Anderson, Dom Liberato, Elliott Fitz, Josh Olson, Brian Muhel Course Name: Calculus Based Physics (Physics 211) Data Collected: 02/17/16 Report Due: 02/24/16 Abstract In this experiment we will be testing Newton’s second law of motion which states that an object will accelerate if an unbalanced force acts on it. At the end of this experiment we should be able to determine the acceleration of a system with a constant mass and a varying force, calculate the mass of the system from our experimental data, and calculate the percentage of error between our experimental findings and the accepted value for a mass. We tested how the acceleration of a system changed as the force increased (keeping the mass a constant). We measured the time it took the length of the cart to get through two gates, being pulled by the force of the hanger. We did 6 separate trials, each time moving one of the weights from the cart to the hanger and used the time through each gate and the length of the cart to determine the average velocity and then the average acceleration. Run 1 had an average acceleration of 0.1018 m/s^2, Run 2 had an average acceleration of 0.5217 m/s^2, Run 3 had an average acceleration of 0.9373m/s^2, Run 4 had an average acceleration of 1.353m/s^2, Run 5 had an average acceleration of 1.741 m/s^2, Run 6 had an average acceleration of 2.199 m/s^2. We then used the mass of the hanger and weights for each trial to find the force exerted. Run 1 had a force of 0.490N, Run 2 had a force of 0.245 N, Run 3 had a force of 0.441 N, Run 4 had a force of 0.637 N, Run 5 had a force of 0.833 N, and Run 6 had a force of 1.03N. We then plotted a graph of acceleration (y-axis) and force (x-axis) and used a best fit line to find the average slope (m) which, based on the equation a=(1/m)f where a (acceleration) is y and f (force) is x and 1/m (1/mass) is the slope, gave us a slope of 2.12 which is the inverse of the mass. The mass then was calculated to be 0.472kg, compared to our measured mass of 0.402kg. This gave us a percent error of 17.4%.

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